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I have two groups, one of designers and one of managers. Each designer has his manager's id stored in his profile.

I would like to loop through the list of managers and get all the designers working for them.

My problem is that the designer profile data needs to be accessed in a special way and I don't want to create a full-on Cartesian product. So what I was thinking was to create a datatype to store the username (string) and manager id (int), which I can access and look up quickly.

What data type would you recommend for this type of lookup functionality?

EDIT: I can not change the structure of any class. Not the manager and not the designer. I want something along the lines of SomeTypeLikeDictionary<int, string> where int is the ID of the manager and string is the full name of the designer. I want to put this in type of collection that will work well with lookups. Example: Now I am looking for all the names of the designers working for manager ID 10.

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Are these just instances of classes in memory, or is a database, file or some other kind of persistent storage involved here? Do you need to do this iteration just once? Or do you need to have the ability to later on go and get the list of designers for an arbitrary manager? Do the lists change while the program is running? Do designers ever get moved to another manager? How do you know when that happens? –  Chris Shain Apr 9 '12 at 18:15
    
@ChrisShain - Thank you for your reply. It doesn't really matter how the data is persisted, updated, managed, etc. I will look up the colletion for each manager (i.e. each manager ID), and I want to do the full loop through the designers group just once, and in that one loop, store them in a more lookup oriented datatype. –  Elad Lachmi Apr 9 '12 at 18:22
    
OK, so based on the edit, what's wrong with Dictionary<String, Int32>? –  Chris Shain Apr 9 '12 at 19:17

2 Answers 2

Based on the comments above, I am going to assume the following:

public class Manager {
    public Int32 ManagerId { get; set; }
    public String ManagerName { get; set; }
}

public class Designer {
    public Int32 DesignerId { get; set; }
    public Int32 ManagerId { get; set; }
    public String DesignerName { get; set; }
}

Assuming that the manager for a given designer is static, I'd modify the manager class thus:

public class Manager {
    private List<Designer> _designers = new List<Designer>();
    public Int32 ManagerId { get; set; }
    public String ManagerName { get; set; }
    public IList<Designer> Designers { get { return _designers; } }
}

then store the managers in a subclass of KeyedCollection:

using System.Collections.ObjectModel;
public class ManagerList : KeyedCollection<Int32, Manager> {
    protected override int GetKeyForItem(Manager item)
    {
        return item.ManagerId;
    }
}

// Somewhere else
var managerList = new ManagerList();
var someManager = new Manager { ManagerId = 1, ManagerName="Bill Lundberg" };
managerList.Add(someManager);

foreach (var designer in myDesigners)
    managerList[designer.ManagerId].Designers.Add(designer);

Of course, all of this doesn't take into account any changes in the management of designers. Which is why I asked :-)

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Sorry for the misunderstanding. Editing the original post... –  Elad Lachmi Apr 9 '12 at 18:37

With Chris Shain's assumed type:

public class Designer { 
    public Int32 DesignerId { get; set; } 
    public Int32 ManagerId { get; set; } 
    public String DesignerName { get; set; } 
} 

And, assuming you have a designers collection representing all of the designers, you could use linq for this:

Dictionary<int, IEnumerable<Designer>> designerLookup = designers
    .GroupBy(designer => designer.ManagerId)
    .ToDictionary(group => group.Key);
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