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I was wondering, what is the significance of the additional parenthesis when initializing an object. For example:

var foo = function(){ ... }();

versus

var foo = (function(){ ... }());

I assume something related to scope but I was wondering if someone can be more precise about the specific differences since they both seem to initialize an object based on what each anonymous function returns.

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2  
In that specific case, there's no effective difference. Some people like the outer (...) because it gives them a visual hint near the = operator that the function is being invoked. –  squint Apr 9 '12 at 19:20
    
You should post this as an answer so I can upvote it. :) –  t3rse Apr 9 '12 at 19:23
    
Alrighty. stackoverflow.com/a/10078589/1106925 –  squint Apr 9 '12 at 19:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In that specific case, there's no effective difference.

Some people like the outer (...) because it gives them a visual hint near the = operator that the function is being invoked.

But the assignment operator causes the function to be evaluated as the expression that is the right hand operand of the assignment operator, and as such it can be invoked without any further need to coerce it out of a function declaration.


Without the assignment, there needs to be some syntax involved that lets the interpreter know that the function keyword is being used as an anonymous function expression.

For example...

(function() {
   // code
})();

Here the parentheses resolved the ambiguity of function so that it's treated as the single expression inside the (...) group.


The grouping operator is just one way of forcing a function to be evaluated as an expression. Most JavaScript operators can be used for this purpose. Unary operators are probably safest, for example...

!function() {
   // code
}();

...or...

void function() {
   // code
}();

In both cases, the function is seen as the single operand to the respective operator.

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Both are functionally equivalent.

However, as a convention, many programmers prefer the opening parenthesis to denote the var is the result of a function, and not the function itself.

The use of self-calling functions is to pass in variables to preserve their "namespaces", for example, it's common to pass in window or document, or other things like jquery.

According to some quick tests on jslint, the preferred way of doing so is the first (foo) in the following tests.

var foo = (function () {}());
var bar = (function () {})();
var baz = function () {}();

Note the that invoking () are inside of the outer parenthesis.

JSLint gives the following errors for bar and baz

Error:

Problem at line 2 character 28: Move the invocation into the parens that contain the function.

var bar = (function (w) {})(window);

Problem at line 3 character 27: Wrap an immediate function invocation in parentheses to assist the reader in understanding that the expression is the result of a function, and not the function itself.

var baz = function (w) {}(window);

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As far as I know, this is just a convention and isn't absolutely necessary.

This is a good post about why this convention is useful:

http://peter.michaux.ca/articles/an-important-pair-of-parens

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