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I have a final member data:

public final Foo foo;

in the constructor, foo is initialized as follow:

foo = new Foo();

Now, unfortunately, Foo's constructor might throw an exception:

try {
    foo = new Foo();
} catch (Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

But now compiler complains that foo might not be initialized, which is true if Foo's constructor throws an exception. But if I put foo = null inside the catch braces, it complains that foo might have been initialized.

Foo is a third-party library that I cannot modify.

So, what's the most graceful way of handling this?

share|improve this question
    
I'm not getting a complaint from the compiler, even without the try/catch block. Did you make your class's constructor throw the exception raised by Foo? –  Tony Ennis Apr 9 '12 at 19:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted
foo = createFoo();

...


private static Foo createFoo() {
    try {
        return new Foo();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return null;
    }
}

I make no comment about whether it makes sense to continue with construction of your outer object if the inner object's constructor has failed...

share|improve this answer
    
Hah. Didn't think of that. Thanks! –  DumpHole Apr 9 '12 at 19:34
final Foo foo ;
Foo foo_temp = null ;
try {
    foo_temp = new Foo();
} catch (Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
} finally {
    foo = foo_temp ;
}
share|improve this answer
    
In the case of an exception, isn't foo_temp uninitialized here? –  Tony Ennis Apr 9 '12 at 19:43
    
@TonyEnnis I think you are right. –  emory Apr 9 '12 at 19:46
    
hey, at least someone cared enough to read your code ;-) –  Tony Ennis Apr 9 '12 at 19:51

Maybe I don't understand, but I don't get the error. Note that ConTest's constructor throws the exception that Foo raises. This to me is most elegant (to answer your question.) If Foo fails to initialize, isn't something terribly wrong?

ConTest.java:

   public class ConTest {
       public final Foo foo;
       public ConTest() throws Exception {
           foo = new Foo(3);
       }
   }

Foo.java:

   public class Foo {
       public Foo(int i) throws Exception {
           if (i < 0) throw new Exception("yah");
       }
   }

and it all compiles fine.

share|improve this answer
    
If ConTest's constructor throws an exception, then yes, something is terribly wrong with foo. but that does not mean ConTest has to rethrow that exception. ConTest should still be functional even if foo failed to initialize. –  DumpHole Apr 9 '12 at 20:39
    
That is very strange to me. Are you going to have a lot of if (foo != null...) in your code? –  Tony Ennis Apr 9 '12 at 20:47
    
Not a lot, but I'm not in charge of the entire source code, so I have to abide to the existing contract. –  DumpHole Apr 9 '12 at 21:03

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