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I would like to have both a hover and remove hover event. The nodes which have this event are added dynamically, so I wish to use on(). When adding a hover event, it works great (the #second list below). For some reason when I add the off hover event, not even the add hover event will work (#first list below).

Please provide any clues. A live example is located at http://jsfiddle.net/NV7hR/

Thanks

$(document).ready(function() {
  $("#first").on("hover", "a", function(event) {
    $(this).parent().css("background-color", "yellow");
  }, function(event) {
    $(this).parent().css("background-color", "");
  });
  $("#second").on("hover", "a", function(event) {
    $(this).parent().css("background-color", "yellow");
  });
});

<body>
<ul id="first">
    <li><a href="#"/>Link</a></li>
    <li><a href="#"/>Link</a></li>
    <li><a href="#"/>Link</a></li>
</ul>
<ul id="second">
    <li><a href="#"/>Link</a></li>
    <li><a href="#"/>Link</a></li>
    <li><a href="#"/>Link</a></li>
</ul>
</body>
share|improve this question
3  
.hover is shorthand form of mouseenter and mouseleave events. Hover as such is not an event. And .on('hover'.. is not a valid syntax. –  Vega Apr 9 '12 at 19:36
    
api.jquery.com/hover it's all there... RTFM! –  Niko Apr 9 '12 at 19:38
    
@Niko You cannot use hover with .on(). If user1032531 wants to use .on(), they have to split it into mouseenter and mouseleave. Alternately, you can use the .hover() directly. –  Paul Sham Apr 9 '12 at 19:40
    
@SKS: Why do you think .on('hover'... isn't valid syntax? –  squint Apr 9 '12 at 19:43
1  
@amnotiam Actually 'valid syntax' is not the correct word there.. the way he used is not correct. He used it assuming it is same as .hover api which is not the case. –  Vega Apr 9 '12 at 19:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Split the hover into mouseenter and mouseleave, which is what hover is shorthand for anyways.

$("#first").on("mouseenter", "a", function(event) {
   $(this).parent().css("background-color", "yellow");
}).on("mouseleave", "a", function(event) {
   $(this).parent().css("background-color", "");
});
share|improve this answer

.hover as such is not an event. hover is shorthand for mouseenter and mouseleave events. Try using like below,

DEMO

$("#first").on({
    mouseenter: function() {
        $(this).parent().css("background-color", "yellow");
    },
    mouseleave: function() {
        $(this).parent().css("background-color", "");
    }
}, 'a');
share|improve this answer
    
+1 from me for demo ^^ –  Paul Sham Apr 9 '12 at 19:42

In spite of what everyone else claims, you can indeed use 'hover' with .on().

It's just that you can't pass 2 functions. You need to test the event type.

$("#first").on("hover", "a", function(e) {
    $(this).css("background-color", e.type === 'mouseenter' ? "yellow" : '');
});

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/HxuuS/


FYI, the reason passing 2 functions caused it to not work at all is that the first handler was interpreted as the optional data argument to on, so it was only the second handler (the mouseleave one) that was being bound.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't see the point of using the hover shorthand when you have to test the mouse event anyway. –  Sparky Apr 9 '12 at 19:50
1  
+1 from me for showing .on('hover') with event.type –  Vega Apr 9 '12 at 19:50
1  
@Sparky672: There are situations where it makes sense. For example, if I was using .toggleClass() instead of .css(). Even given the above example, it's still less code than assigning separate handlers. –  squint Apr 9 '12 at 19:52

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