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Both these ways work using the same call mechanism.

Obviously, I want to use the best way, but perhaps it is just a matter of preference?

Style-wise I like the Object Literal Notation because it provides enclosure.

Function Notation:

var TextProcessor = function()
{
};
TextProcessor.unEscape = function( second_split )
{
    var element;
    for( element in second_split )
    {
        second_split[element] = second_split[element].replace( '**', '*', 'g' );
        second_split[element] = second_split[element].replace( '|*', '|', 'g' );
    }
    return second_split;
};
TextProcessor.pullBullet = function( text )
{
    var pattern = /<(.+)_([a-z]){1}>$/;
    return pattern.exec( text );
};
TextProcessor.pullDomain = function( text )
{
    return text.match( /:\/\/(www\.)?(.[^\/:]+)/ )[2];
};

Object Literal Notation

/**
 *TextProcessor
 */

var TextProcessor = 
{
    unEscape:    function( text )
    {
        var index;
        for( index in second_split )
        {
            text[index] = text[index].replace( '**', '*', 'g' );
            text[index] = text[index].replace( '|*', '|', 'g' );
        }
        return second_split;
    },
    pullBullet:  function( text )
    {
        var pattern = /<(.+)_([a-z]){1}>$/;
        return pattern.exec( text );
    },
    pullDomain:  function( text )
    {
        return text.match( /:\/\/(www\.)?(.[^\/:]+)/ )[2];
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Some additional information of how you will be using these objects would be helpful. Will there only be one of these objects created, multiple in a loop, etc.? –  James Montagne Apr 9 '12 at 20:43
    
Do you want to know which method is best for a classes creation? Or want solve this particular situation? –  Boyo Apr 9 '12 at 21:00
    
I want a nice class( object ) hierarchy at some point... –  user656925 Apr 9 '12 at 21:10
    
I hope someone smarter than me demonstrates the revealing module pattern for this, too. –  Billbad Apr 10 '12 at 3:39
    
I think I'm going to use this - stackoverflow.com/questions/1595611/… –  user656925 Apr 10 '12 at 16:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're doing two somewhat different things.

  • The first example creates a function object and assigns properties to it.

  • The second example creates a plain object with those properties.

The first one really doesn't make much practical sense in your example. You can use a function object to assign properties, but why would you? Those properties have no impact on the invocation of the function.


"Style-wise I like the Object Literal Notation because it provides enclosure."

I don't know what "enclosure" is. It sounds like a combination of encapsulation and closure, of which an object literal provides neither.


Getting back to the first part, imagine if you created any one of these objects...

var TextProcessor = new Number();
var TextProcessor = new Boolean();
var TextProcessor = new Date();

...and then assigned the properties to it. It would work, but it would be an odd thing to do. The fact that the object is a Number, Boolean, or Date has little relevance to the task at hand.

That's effectively what you're doing when you assign the properties to a Function object.

share|improve this answer
    
Damn! wasn't fast enough to upvote you before you made it a community wiki... –  gdoron Apr 9 '12 at 20:44
2  
The first one can be used to create objects with new, the second cannot. –  Rocket Hazmat Apr 9 '12 at 20:45
    
@gdoron: Gotta be quick! –  squint Apr 9 '12 at 20:45
2  
@Rocket: But with respect to the properties being added to the function object, there's no impact on using the function as a constructor. If the function was intended to be used as a constructor to create objects with those properties, then the properties would need to be assigned to this inside the function body. –  squint Apr 9 '12 at 20:46
1  
I think by "enclosure" he wasn't trying to talk about any technical concept, just that all of the code is "enclosed" in {} rather than being a bunch of separate statements. Could be wrong though. –  James Montagne Apr 9 '12 at 20:48

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