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Consider the two following prototypes:

template<class T>
void whatever1(const T& something);

template<class T>
void whatever2(T const& something);

They are both identical. Yet what if T is not a usual type, but a pointer type? For instance, let T be Somewhere* then whatever1 and whatever2 would have different interpretation:

// nonconst pointer (passed by reference) to const object
void whatever1(const Somewhere*& something);

// const pointer (passed by reference) to nonconst object
void whatever2(Somewhere* const& something);

In this case, I can infer the following properties:

1 whatever1:

a) can modify something inside and these changes propagate to the outside;

b) object pointed by something cannot be modified.

2 whatever2:

a) cannot modify something inside so it is safe outside;

b) object pointed by something can be modified.

Usually const and & are used together to avoid copying when passing a parameter and to protect this parameter from modification at the same time. Then in terms of this philosophy only whatever2 fulfills its role. However, if I want the object pointed by something to be also non-modifiable, then none of two is suitable! Then what would be? Maybe this joke:

template<class T>
void whatever3(const T const& something);

In addition to this confusion some people use whatever1 style, while others use whatever2 one. Which one should be used when creating generic classes and methods as a rule of thumb?

Note that if we start considering Somewhere** as T things get even more confusing.

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void whatever1(const Somewhere*& something); is not a correct translation. It would in fact be void whatever1(Somewhere* const& something);, the same as whatever2. –  ildjarn Apr 9 '12 at 22:06
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your assumption is wrong. When T = U *, then T const & and const T & are both U * const &, and that's it. Similarly, const T and T const are both U * const, and when T = const W, then T * is W const * or const W *. (This is all subject to reference collapsing rules, of course, so assume that neither U nor W are reference types).

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The replacement of T with Somewhere* when the template is instantiated isn't a textual one - so in both cases, the const will apply to the pointer and not the thing at which it points.

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You can't inject a const-qualifier into a named type that way. As a simple example, if you have:

typedef int* P;
const P x;

Then x is of type int* const, not const int*. The const is applied to the whole P type, not just to a part of the P type. The same applies to template type parameters.

If you wanted to inject a const qualifier into the type, you can do so without too much trouble, e.g. by using type traits like remove_pointer and add_const.

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They are both identical. Yet what if T is not a usual type, but a pointer type? For instance, let T be Somewhere* then whatever1 and whatever2 would have different interpretation:

// nonconst pointer (passed by reference) to const object
void whatever1(const Somewhere*& something);

// const pointer (passed by reference) to nonconst object
void whatever2(Somewhere* const& something);

No, actually it wouldn't be void whatever1(const Somewhere*& something);, it would be void whatever1(const (Somewhere*)& something); in invalid C++-like code. The C++ way to write it is your whatever2, but they mean the same thing.

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