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All the network programming guides I can find are in C. ALL of them. Is it even possible to set up a socket connection in C++? If so, what is the #include and where can I find tutorials or documentation? I would assume there must be multiple libraries for this given the prevalence of the language-- which is considered the most well-developed and easy to use?

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-1.. 20 seconds on google would answer this. C++ can call any C API for supported calling conventions. –  JimR Apr 9 '12 at 22:55
    
Do exactly what you would do for C. You might have to add a cast or two, but that's probably it. –  Greg Hewgill Apr 9 '12 at 22:56
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@JimR: Being able to find it on another site via google is not a valid reason to avoid posting the question here. It is of course valid to close as a duplicate if it has already been asked on SO, but the whole point of this place is to create a centralized repository of information. –  Ed S. Apr 9 '12 at 22:57
    
I am completely unfamiliar with this concept. I am not a very experienced programmer, but when I have attempted to include C libraries in the past, e.g. stdio.h, visual studio gave me an error. What is the difference, and/or what am I doing wrong? –  Aerovistae Apr 9 '12 at 22:57
    
C++ is a superset of C. It means that most things you can do in C are possible in C++. –  Gio Borje Apr 9 '12 at 22:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try using boost ASIO.

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is ASIO asynchronous input output? –  Aerovistae Apr 9 '12 at 23:01
    
Yes, it is an amazing library that helps you perform both synchronous and asynchronous socket operations(among other features). –  mfontanini Apr 9 '12 at 23:02
    
I hate to be so inexperienced, but I have to ask: how do you add the boost library to your program? I have never used an external library before. I am using g++ and notepad++, if that's relevant. –  Aerovistae Apr 9 '12 at 23:19
    
If you are using GNU/Linux, then boost asio can be installed from your distro's repository(if any). If you're on Windows, there surely is an installer for you, look it up on boost's website. Then just link it with your application by using the "-l" switch. Boost asio is a header only library, but it depends on the boost_system library, so compile your application by adding the "-lboost_system" command line argument. –  mfontanini Apr 9 '12 at 23:24

There are no significant differences between C and C++ in this respect.

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A very dangerous statement. Especially without further clarification. –  bitmask Apr 9 '12 at 22:55
    
What I mean is that all of those C examples will work in C++ with only minor changes unless they are very unusual. –  David Schwartz Apr 9 '12 at 22:57
    
Reposted comment: I am completely unfamiliar with this concept. I am not a very experienced programmer, but when I have attempted to include C libraries in C++ programs in the past, e.g. stdio.h, Visual Studio gave me an error. What is the difference, and/or what am I doing wrong? –  Aerovistae Apr 9 '12 at 22:58
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What error did you get? –  David Schwartz Apr 9 '12 at 22:59
    
@Aerovistae: Something else was wrong, there is no reason that including C libraries would throw an error in C++. –  Ed S. Apr 9 '12 at 22:59

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