Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to do some calculation, but if they took too much time(say 10 sec), I want to stop it and show current best result.

Is it ready way to do it in Java? I don't want to write time checking in every function.

share|improve this question
    
docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/util/Timer.html Does this help at all? –  MDeSchaepmeester Apr 9 '12 at 23:23
    
"I don't want.." Why should we care what you want? It's what works that matters. Can you come up with a better reason to give your question attention? –  Andrew Thompson Apr 10 '12 at 6:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use Timer as suggested or go for multiple threads. In your main program, another thread with the calculation is started. The main thread sleeps via Thread.sleep and terminates the calculation after the timeout.

main thread +-------+---sleeping---termination----+
                    |                 |
another thread      +---calculation---+
share|improve this answer
    
When you do it that way, the calculation will always take ten seconds. That is very inefficient. –  Shawn Shroyer Apr 10 '12 at 0:41
    
You're right. Unless you let the calculation interrupt the sleeping thread after completing calculation. –  phineas Apr 10 '12 at 6:19

You could make a separate thread that you can start at the beginning of your calculation thread, and after 10 seconds with the Timer.sleep(int) method, set a boolean value to true. Then in the calculation thread, if(finished) break;

share|improve this answer

Have another thread with a loop that increments a value every second, and then exits at 10 seconds.

public class counter extends Thread, implements Runnable{
 public void run()
{
 for(int index=0; index<10; index++)//Waits ten seconds
{
this.sleep(1000);//ms
}
System.exit(0);//Closes the application
}

The main Thread can still execute, though. To cancel the shutdown I suppose you could have a volatile boolean that gets set to true if input was recieved in time.

share|improve this answer
    
It's very unclear how this code contributes to a solution. Furthermore it's sufficient to extend Thread or implement Runnable. –  phineas Apr 9 '12 at 23:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.