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I was trying to use the overload operator method to copy the entries of one queue into another, but I am going wrong with my function. I don't know how else to access the values of the queue "original" any other way than what I have below:

struct Node
{
   int item;
   Node* next;
};

class Queue
{
public:
    // Extra code here
    void operator = (const Queue &original);
protected:
    Node *front, *end;
};

void Queue::operator=(const Queue &original)
{
    //THIS IS WHERE IM GOING WRONG
    while(original.front->next != NULL) {
        front->item = original.front->item;
        front->next = new Node;
        front = front->next;
        original.front = original.front->next;
    }
}
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3  
There is already a std::queue class. –  Griwes Apr 9 '12 at 23:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
void Queue::operator=(const Queue &original)
{
    Node* tmp = original.front;
    //THIS IS WHERE IM GOING WRONG
    while(tmp->next != NULL) {
        front->item = tmp->item;
        front->next = new Node;
        front = front->next;
        tmp = tmp->next;
    }
}
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Isn't that what I am doing anyways? –  Josh Apr 9 '12 at 23:31
    
No. You are always modifing front in your version. In the above version is modifed before starting, but not in the loop so front is not changing and pointing to the start of the queue. –  Glenn Apr 9 '12 at 23:39
    
phew, i thought that the idea is simple - there is difference in what you're modifying. in your example, you're changing the object in reference, in my one you've got your own variable you can change –  Yossarian Apr 9 '12 at 23:43
    
Be aware that this is unexpected, the target queue is extended, not assigned (which operator= would imply). –  modelnine Apr 9 '12 at 23:54

Do you have a functional copy constructor? If so, I'd implement your assignment operator in terms of your copy constructor like so:

#include <algorithm>  // <utility> for C++11

void Queue::operator=(const Queue &other)
{
    // Assumes your only field is the "front" pointer.

    Queue tmp(other);   // May throw.
    std::swap(front, tmp.front);  // Will not throw.
}

The idea is that you perform any operations that can throw an exception (like your call to operator new()) on the side in a temporary object that will clean up resources, and then "commit" your changes by swapping the contents in a non-throwing operation so that the state of your Queue is sane even if an exception is thrown in during the construction of tmp. Pointer assignment is guaranteed not to throw, which is why the call to std::swap() is non-throwing in this case. Upon leaving the scope of your assignment operator tmp's destructor should clean up your old link list since its front was swapped with your old front.

See GotW #59 for details about this "copy-to-temporary-and-swap" idiom, and how it relates to the strong exception safety guarantee.

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