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I have a python program and I'm trying to import other python classes and I am getting a NameError:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "run.py", line 3, in <module>
    f = wow('fgd')
NameError: name 'wow' is not defined

This is in file called new.py:

class wow(object):
    def __init__(self, start):
        self.start = start

    def go(self):
        print "test test test"
        f = raw_input("> ") 
        if f == "test":
            print "!!"  
            return c.vov()  
        else:
            print "nope"    
            return f.go()

class joj(object):
    def __init__(self, start):
        self.start = start
    def vov(self):
       print " !!!!! "

This is in file run.py:

from new import *

f = wow('fgd')
c = joj('fds')
f.go()

What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
When asking Python questions, is always useful to indicate what error happened in your code. This case can be an easily deduced NameError but some other times is not that obvious and it costs you zero effort to add such information. –  C2H5OH Apr 10 '12 at 0:03
    
Is your indentation here the same as in your files? It looks like if f == "test" and following is meant to be one indent to the right. –  lvc Apr 10 '12 at 0:06
    
new is a bad choice of name for your module. There is already a (deprecated) builtin module called new –  gnibbler Apr 10 '12 at 0:18
    
Just a note, I'd suggest avoiding from ___ import * - it's (generally) a bad habit to get into. Instead, import whatever you want to use explicitly, or import the module and use <module>.<thing>. –  Amber Apr 10 '12 at 0:25
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can't do that, as f is in a different namespace.

You need to pass your instance of wow your joj instance. To do this, we first create them the other way around, so c exists to pass into f:

from new import *

c = joj('fds')
f = wow('fgd', c)
f.go()

and then we add the parameter c to wow, storing the reference as self.c and use self instead of f as f doesn't exist in this namespace - the object you are referring to is now self:

class wow(object):
    def __init__(self, start, c):
        self.start = start
        self.c = c

    def go(self):
        print "test test test"
        f = raw_input("> ") 
        if f == "test":
            print "!!"  
            return self.c.vov()  
        else:
            print "nope"    
            return self.go()

class joj(object):
    def __init__(self, start):
        self.start = start
    def vov(self):
       print " !!!!! "

Think of each class and function as a fresh start, none of the variables you define elsewhere fall into them.

share|improve this answer
    
You need to do something with c in wow.__init__ if you expect it to be usable in wow.go, too. I didn't edit to show this because that actually requires a whole new set of explanation, which I think you're more than capable of writing up :) You might also want to say something about the use of recursion to establish a trivial loop... –  Karl Knechtel Apr 10 '12 at 0:10
    
Missed that one. Edited. –  Lattyware Apr 10 '12 at 0:13
    
I would have never figured that out thanks!! –  Joseph Goodwin Apr 10 '12 at 0:42
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