Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following query returns a result set of all the new_name from the table names

SELECT
    CASE
        WHEN nickname = '' THEN fullname ELSE nickname END AS new_name,       
    FROM names

I'm trying to search by new_name using the following query

SELECT
    CASE
        WHEN nickname = '' THEN fullname ELSE nickname END AS new_name,       
    FROM names
    WHERE new_name LIKE '%Joh%'

However I get the error

Unknown column 'new_name' in 'where clause'

Is there a way I get this functionality to work without using a subquery?

share|improve this question
    
You have a typo - the ; after the from clause. It that it? –  Steve Mallory Apr 10 '12 at 1:16
    
Doesn't mysql have coalesce? –  Brad Christie Apr 10 '12 at 1:19
    
@SteveMallory - Good catch but I don't think that's the problem. I simplified the query for sake of example, and in doing so created a typo –  user784637 Apr 10 '12 at 1:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you repeat the case in the where clause, the statement will work:

SELECT
CASE
    WHEN nickname = '' THEN fullname ELSE nickname END AS new_name      
FROM names
WHERE (CASE WHEN nickname = '' THEN fullname ELSE nickname END) LIKE '%Joh%'

It wouldn't be fast, because it wouldn't use indexes, but it should work.

A somewhat better approach would be as follows:

SELECT
CASE
    WHEN nickname = '' THEN fullname ELSE nickname END AS new_name      
FROM names
WHERE (nickname like '%Joh%') or (fullname LIKE '%Joh%')

This will return the same results, but it can use indexes on nickname and fullname if you define them, EDIT and change the second operand of LIKE to not use the leading %.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks dasblinkenlight. I'm using this in an autocomplete with 0 delay between a keystroke and the execution of the query so the speed upgrade in the second example was exactly what I was looking for! –  user784637 Apr 10 '12 at 1:23
    
+1 for considering performance –  cctan Apr 10 '12 at 1:25
    
That won't use indexes either! LIKE doesn't use index when the value starts with %, and also even if it could, it can only use one index and the OR precludes using an index –  Bohemian Apr 10 '12 at 1:29
    
It's okay, I have another statement WHERE user_id = ? so the execution order first goes by that statement, and then checks for the nickname. But that's a good point you brought up that I didn't know of. –  user784637 Apr 10 '12 at 1:33
    
@Bohemian Oh, you're right, I missed the % at the beginning, assuming the more usual "starts with" semantics. I updated the answer, thanks! –  dasblinkenlight Apr 10 '12 at 1:35
SELECT
    CASE
        WHEN nickname = '' THEN fullname ELSE nickname END AS new_name,       
    FROM names
    WHERE 
       (CASE
        WHEN nickname = '' THEN fullname ELSE nickname END) LIKE '%Joh%';

replace the column name with the whole case ... when ... then ... end

share|improve this answer

To me it makes more sense to use coalesce function, assuming nickname is either NULL or populated...

SELECT COALESCE(nickname,filename)
FROM   table
WHERE COALESCE(nickname,filename) LIKE '%JOE%'
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.