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if we have an array of integers then how can we determine the minimum steps required to sort them(in ascending order) if the only allowed operation per step is : moving the elements to either extremes? E.g if we have

7 8 9 11 1 10

then in 1st step one can move 11 to right end and in second step move 1 to left end to get 1 7 8 9 10 11 . Hence total steps = 2 Can bubble sort be applied here? but the worst case complexity would be O(n^2) then. So how can we do more efficiently? Thanks.

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4 Answers

Here is a solution that takes O(n log n) time, O(n) auxiliary space, and exactly n MoveToFront operations.

Given the input array, A, Make a second array, B, with value/index pairs, like so...

7 8 9 11 1 10  ->  (7 0) (8 1) (9 2) (11 3) (1 4) (10 5)
[this step takes O(n) time and O(n) space]

then sort B in descending order of the value of each pair...

(7 0) (8 1) (9 2) (11 3) (1 4) (10 5) -> (11 3) (10 5) (9 2) (8 1) (7 0) (1 4)
[this step takes O(n log n) time]

prepare a binary search tree, T.

Now for each element in B do the following...

Let I be the index of this element.
Let V be the sum of I and the number of elements in T that are greater than I.
Do a MoveToFront operation on the Vth element of A.
Add I to T.
[Both of the operations on T take O(log n) time]

Here is this algorithm working on your example array

(11 3)
    I := 3
    V := 3 + 0 = 3
    MoveToFront(3): 7 8 9 11 1 10  ->  11 7 8 9 1 10
    T: ()  ->  (3)

(10 5)
    I := 5
    V := 5 + 0 = 5
    MoveToFront(5): 11 7 8 9 1 10  ->  10 11 7 8 9 1
    T: (3)  ->  (3 5)

(9 2)
    I := 2
    V := 2 + 2 = 4
    MoveToFront(4): 10 11 7 8 9 1  ->  9 10 11 7 8 1
    T: (3 5)  ->  (2 3 5)

(8 1)
    I := 1
    V := 1 + 3 = 4
    MoveToFront(4): 9 10 11 7 8 1  ->  8 9 10 11 7 1
    T: (2 3 5)  ->  (1 2 3 5)

(7 0)
    I := 0
    V := 0 + 4 = 4
    MoveToFront(4): 8 9 10 11 7 1  ->  7 8 9 10 11 1
    T: (1 2 3 5)  ->  (0 1 2 3 5)

(1 4)
    I := 4
    V := 4 + 1 = 5
    MoveToFront(5): 7 8 9 10 11 1  ->  1 7 8 9 10 11
    T: (0 1 2 3 5)  ->  (0 1 2 3 4 5)

I imagine you can find ways to sort these arrays that use fewer than n MoveToFront/Back operations, but I don't think you can find those in less than O(n log n) time. If those operations are slow, though, then it might be worth using an algorithm that takes more time to plan so you can do fewer of those operations.

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That doesn't solve a problem, as author's example returns 2, but your seems to return 5. Am I missing something? –  Archeg Apr 10 '12 at 7:13
    
The author asks if we can sort an array more efficiently than n^2 MoveToFront/Back operations. I showed here that we can do it in n MoveToFront/Back operations if we take O(n log n) time to do it, and I postulate that we can not do better than that without taking more than O(n log n) time. –  Running Wild Apr 10 '12 at 7:19
    
Nice. This reminds me of spoj.pl/problems/YODANESS which I used a similar tree for. (though i could have used a range tree) –  robert king Apr 10 '12 at 12:56
    
i think we can find the number of inversions and add some constriant there? –  pranay Apr 10 '12 at 13:02
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Can you clarify this problem a little bit? When you say list, do you mean a linked list or do you mean an array? If it's not a linked list, I'm a little confused by the limited operation set. If it is a linked list you can probably modify quicksort which runs in average case O(nlgn) time.

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its an array..updated –  pranay Apr 10 '12 at 5:36
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Essentially the data structure you are mentioning is a linked list. For linked lists you can use quicksort or mergesort ( O(nlogn) ).

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That doesn't sound to me like a sorting problem. You need to just find how many movements you need to do, but you don't need to sort the array. I bet that could be done faster than O(n log n)

I propose such solution: just count how many a[i] > a[i - 1]. And that will be your result.

Argumentation: If you have a[i] > a[i-1], it means, that either a[i] or a[i-1] aren't in their places. So you can:

1) move a[i-1] to the beginning of the array

2) move a[i] to the end of the array.

Upd. You need to define which a[i] or a[i-1] are you moving, as for your example for the array: 7 8 9 11 1 10 you have two comparations, that shows what aren't in place: 11 > 1 and 11 > 10. So that is definetely a task for dynamic programming. But, it is still faster then O(n log n)

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