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This is a very common thing in web applications. If I have a user table and I want to keep track of all the changes made to the user table, I can use a database insert and update triggers to save those changes in the user_history table.

But what if I have user_products table, where I have user_id , product_id, cost. When I add a user in the system lets say I have two products associated with that user. So my user_products table will have two rows for that user.

user_id product_id cost
1       10         1000
2       20         2000

Now if I go to the edit user page and delete product 1 , add product 3 , change cost for product 2 from 2000 to 3000.

so normally I delete all records for user_id 1 from user_product table and then do a new insert for the new products.

So its not a regular update but a delete and then insert. Hence I am not able to keep track of history changes.

Ideally I would want to know that I deleted product 1 , added product 3 , changed cost for product 2 from 2000 to 3000.

EDIT 1:-

I am not doing a update. I am doing a delete and then insert. So I am deleting record with product id 2 and cost 2000. And then again inserting record with prod id 2 but with cost 3000. So technically its delete and insert but logically only cost is changed from 2000 to 3000. If i check while executing both queries it will say i deleted product with id 2 and and then added product with id 2 which are same. But I want to be able to see that the cost has chnaged from 2000 to 3000

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1  
Why not just do an update rather than a delete and an insert? –  Dan A. Apr 10 '12 at 3:57
    
@Dan A. Its basically one to many relationship from user to product. User can have 100s of products. If user has 10 products now. He may have 40 products later on. If I add a new product to user I will have to check if that user product mapping exist in table or not. If yes then update and if not then do insert. So for me its easy to just delete everything and then insert all products again. This way i dont have to check for existing and new records and run insert or update query accordingly. –  anything Apr 10 '12 at 4:05
3  
Any convenience you gain from not checking for the existence of products to update is lost when you try to track history. In my opinion it's better practice to perform a "logical update" by actually doing a "technical update". What if you decide to add columns "create_date" and "last_updated" to your product record? It's trivial to do if you update an existing record. –  Dan A. Apr 10 '12 at 14:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One option would be to create a user_product_history table that is populated by triggers on user_product and then define a trigger that transforms the old 'delete' row in the history table into an update if the row is subsequently inserted.

CREATE TABLE user_product_history (
  user_id         number,
  product_id      number,
  cost            number,
  operation_type  varchar2(1),
  operation_date  date
);

CREATE TRIGGER trg_user_product_history
  AFTER INSERT OR UPDATE OR DELETE ON user_product
  FOR EACH ROW
DECLARE 
  l_cnt integer;
BEGIN
  IF( deleting )
  THEN
    insert into user_product_history( user_id, product_id, cost, operation_type, operation_date )
      values( :old.user_id, :old.product_id, :old.cost, 'D', sysdate );
  ELSIF( updating )
  THEN
    insert into user_product_history( user_id, product_id, cost, operation_type, operation_date )
      values( :new.user_id, :new.product_id, :new.cost, 'U', sysdate );
  ELSIF( inserting )
  THEN
    select count(*)
      into l_cnt
      from user_product_history
     where operation_type = 'D' 
       and user_id        = :new.user_id
       and product_id     = :new.product_id;
    if( l_cnt > 0 )
    then
      update user_product_history
         set operation_type = 'U',
             operation_date = sysdate,
             cost           = :new.cost
       where operation_type = 'D' 
         and user_id        = :new.user_id
         and product_id     = :new.product_id;
    else
      insert into user_product_history( user_id, product_id, cost, operation_type, operation_date )
        values( :new.user_id, :new.product_id, :new.cost, 'I', sysdate );
    end if;
  END IF;
END;

From an efficiency standpoint, however, doing deletes and inserts rather than updates is going to mean that you're putting far more load on your database than is necessary. You'll do substantially more I/O than necessary. And you'll end up with much more complicated code for handling changes. You'll almost certainly be better served figuring out what has changed and then just updating those rows.

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Thanks for the answer. See I have updated my question. Will this trigger and table work in my situation? –  anything Apr 10 '12 at 3:55
    
@Ashish - I posted an example of how you could adapt the trigger to treat an insert following a delete as a logical update in the history table. But you'd be far better served to just do an update to begin with. –  Justin Cave Apr 10 '12 at 4:42
2  
Another disadvantage of trying to convert an insert into an update in the history table is that you can't really distinguish between a real update and an actual delete followed by an insert at a later time. –  Dan A. Apr 10 '12 at 15:33
    
@Justin Cave. Now that I have audit log table ready. How DO i show this to users. I mean audit table has ids like product_id, user_id etc. How do I join them to their respective tables and get the names like user anme and product name? Please help. –  anything Apr 12 '12 at 13:23
    
@Ashish - I'm not sure I understand the question... Presumably, you'd join the USER table and to the PRODUCT table the same way you would if you were querying the USER_PRODUCT table. SELECT * FROM user_product_history JOIN user USING (user_id) JOIN product USING (product_id) –  Justin Cave Apr 12 '12 at 14:06

I don't know if there is a "standard" way or simple one but for my experience, you have to do it yourself... Of course, you don't need to code a specific method for each table but a generic method that handles all update SQL, something smart according your tables structure. Example: You can define a history table that will have: id - table name - table record id - list of fields to update - list of values updated BEFORE - list of values updated AFTER

Then, into your code, you should have an abstract class that will handle the SQL queries: on update, you call the method that will parse the SQL query and insert a record into this table, even you have to query a SELECT to retrieve the data BEFORE the updates (the overhead is minimum because the SELECT uses only few resources and you can use the DB server cache). Finally, when you display the information relative to a record, let's say the user, you can add the code to display the history on this table AND for this user id.

Hope it will help you.

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Thanks for the answer. But I am not doing a update. I am doing a delete and then insert. So I am deleting record with product id 2 and cost 2000. And then again inserting record with prod id 2 but with cost 3000. So technically its delete and insert but logically only cost is changed from 2000 to 3000. If i check while executing both queries it will say i deleted product with id 2 and and then added product with id 2 which are same. But I want to be able to see that the cost has chnaged from 2000 to 3000 –  anything Apr 10 '12 at 3:48
    
but the solution I mentionned is the same: when I wrote "update", I wanted to mean "insert/update/delete". To complete the solution for you, I suggest you to insert another column for the operation: update/insert/delete. Then into the method, you can fill this column easily, as the SQL query starts with select, insert, update or delete...that's what I have right now with my application! and it works fine. Of course, my history has more fields such as user_id, date, the sql to be executed... –  Yoong Kim Apr 10 '12 at 4:09

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