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I'm preparing my self for a test tomorrow morning. I am struggling with the below C++ walkthrough. I have run the code and used cout to check the execution of the program. The first thing that I noticed that the program is calling the default constructor in class "one" for 3 times just for the first object in main. I am really confused with the execution of the code.

    #include <iostream>
    using namespace std;

    class one {
    int n;
    int m;
      public:
    one() { n = 5; m = 6; cout << "one one made\n"; }
    one(int a, int b) {
      n = a;
      m = b;
      cout << "made one one\n";
    }
    friend ostream &operator<<(ostream &, one);
    };

    ostream &operator<<(ostream &os, one a) {
    return os << a.n << '/' << a.m << '=' <<
     (a.n/a.m) << '\n';
    }

    class two {
    one x;
    one y;
      public:
    two() { cout << "one two made\n"; }
    two(int a, int b, int c, int d) {
      x = one(a, b);
      y = one(c, d);
      cout << "made one two\n";
    }
    friend ostream &operator<<(ostream &, two);
    };

    ostream &operator<<(ostream &os, two a) {
    return os << a.x << a.y;
    }

    int main() {
    two t1, t2(4, 2, 8, 3);
    cout << t1 << t2;
    one t3(5, 10), t4;
    cout << t3 << t4;
    return 0;
    } 

I don't understand the first thing. When the main calls the first default constructor two t1, why is it been called three times in a row then it will call t2(4, 2, 8, 3);?

I am sorry if the code is too long, but I really need help to understand it.

Please advise. Thank you.

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marked as duplicate by Greg Hewgill Jun 5 at 2:24

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Please elaborate your question what you cant understand from this code? –  SMK Apr 10 '12 at 5:01
    
There's a specific optimization allowed by C++, where in certain cases the compiler may remove temporaries. That makes it harder to predict how many constructors will be called. It's quite common that compilers will leave extra ctor calls in while debugging, but remove them for the final release version. –  MSalters Apr 10 '12 at 7:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I get this result when I run the code:

one one made
one one made
one two made
one one made
one one made
made one one
made one one
made one two

This is because:

two t1;
one one made //t1.x; parameterless 'one' constructor called by default
one one made //t1.y; parameterless 'one' constructor called by default
one two made //t1; parameterless 'two' constructor

t2(4, 2, 8, 3)
one one made //t2.x; default constructor as variable not present in initialization list

one one made //t2.y; default constructor as variable not present in initialization list

made one one //x = one(a, b) executed now
made one one //y = one(c, d) executed now
made one two //t2(int..) constructer called

Note that x and y are constructed twice in case of t2 as there is no initialization list. To avoid this, you can use:

two(int a, int b, int c, int d): x(a,b), y(c,d)
{
cout << "made one two\n";
}
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Ok just to clarify this. So because it has to call the default constructor in "one" for x and y and it has to call its own default constructor in "two" thats why I end up getting for t1 object called twice in "one" and once in "two", right? –  Jack Apr 10 '12 at 5:44
1  
Yes. As soon as you create an object of 'two', all of its member variables will be constructed by default (x and y in this case). After this the body of constructor is executed: "cout << "one two made\n"; " Now the construction of t1 is complete. –  vid Apr 10 '12 at 6:00

You'll see both class "one" and class "two"'s constructors occuring THREE times because THREE instances of both objects are created.

If you look carefully at the inserter friend function, class one and two are both passed by value instead of by reference. a temp instance must be created by way of the default copy constructor (which you don't have implemented). if you want to do away with the extra instantiation, change your inserter functions to this:

friend ostream &operator<<(ostream &, one &obj); 
friend ostream &operator<<(ostream &, two &obj); 

and as I look further, two has 2 member variables of type one, so you'll see even more constructors I figure.

and lastly, test classes like this should be named foo and bar. one and two are difficult to communicate even to oneself. (imho)

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Thank you. I see what you are saying but this code is provided by the instructor. –  Jack Apr 10 '12 at 5:12
    
ok but why when it says two t1, we don't call the two default constructor? –  Jack Apr 10 '12 at 5:17
1  
I suspect if you were to step through the code in a debugger you would see that the two constructors are called. I'm using my brain debugger here at the moment however so I'm only as certain as that. :) –  KenK Apr 10 '12 at 5:56

From your first object in main.Two default constructors of "one" is called because class "two" has two objects of class "one" and one default constructor is called of "Two" as normal.

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Here is that output that I see:

one one made
one one made
one two made
one one made
one one made
made one one
made one one
made one two
5/6=0
5/6=0
4/2=2
8/3=2
made one one
one one made
5/10=0
5/6=0

And it make perfect sense to me. I don't see the default constructor of one being called 3 times for the first object.

As far as the output goes, here what happens:

two t1, t2(4, 2, 8, 3);

For t1, it calls default constructor of one, for both the objects that are defined in class

two (one x and one y)

so output is "one one made" and "one one made" next it executes the default constructor of two so the output is "one two made" next for t2, it again calls default constructor of one for both x and y so the output is "one one made" and "one one made" next it executes

x = one(a,b) and y =one(c,d)

so now it prints "made one one" and "made one one" now in the constructor of two() as we have "made one two" the same gets printed...

cout << t1 << t2;

one t3(5, 10), t4;

For this statement again, for t3, it calls the constructor of one and prints "made one one" And for t4 it executes the default constructor and prints "one one made"

cout << t3 << t4;
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