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let us suppose some (legacy) code, which cannot be touched, declare

struct B{
 public:
  void f(){}
};

and let us suppose to have

struct A{
 public:
  virtual void f()=0;
};

is it possible to make an A subclass call B::f without explicitly calling f(), i.e. instead of

  struct C: public A, public B{
   void f(){
   B::f();
  }
 };

having something like

 struct C:virtual public A,virtual public B{

 };

(note that this last class is abstract, for the compiler A::f is not defined)

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2  
What's wrong with B::f()? That is the correct way to call B::f(). –  Charles Bailey Apr 10 '12 at 5:47
    
imagine you have 100 functions ;) –  Fabio Dalla Libera Apr 10 '12 at 5:49
1  
No, there's no way that base member functions can implement pure virtual functions for another base class. That just doesn't work. What you have is fine. –  Kerrek SB Apr 10 '12 at 5:53
    
OK, I have a hundred functions, what's the relevance of that on this question? –  Charles Bailey Apr 10 '12 at 5:54
    
I guess he wants to avoid writing boilerplate code. –  Alexander Putilin Apr 10 '12 at 6:04
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5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Directly in C++, it is impossible to dispatch polymorphically based on some implicit matching of B's functions to A's. You could resort to some kind of code generation using gccxml or other similar products, but if there's only a hundred functions a macro can reduce the forwarding to a one-liner anyway - not worth introducing extra tools unless you've got thousands and thousands of these to do.

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"dispatch polymorphically based on some implicit matching of B's functions to A's" G++ used to support so-called "signatures": Type Abstraction using Signatures "In GNU C++, you can use the keyword signature to define a completely abstract class interface as a datatype. You can connect this abstraction with actual classes using signature pointers. (...) Subtyping becomes independent from inheritance. (...) Signatures allow you to work with existing class hierarchies as implementations of a signature type." –  curiousguy Jul 26 '12 at 10:25
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You could do something like:

void C::f() {
    B* b = this;
    b->f();
}
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thank you but, I do not want to write the implementation of each function (furthermore,what is the benefit of this version over the one I wrote?) –  Fabio Dalla Libera Apr 10 '12 at 6:02
    
@FabioDallaLibera: I don't understand. If you don't want to write a function called f in C then why are you declaring such a function? There's no difference between this implementation of C::f and yours in this case other than this one doesn't use B::f which you wanted to avoid. –  Charles Bailey Apr 10 '12 at 6:31
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No, you can't do that. And from the snippet you've shown us it looks like B should be a member of C by composition rather than inheritance. You'll just have to write some forwarding functions (or a script to generate them for you automatically).

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Make an implementation of A which delegates to B:

class A_Impl : public A
{
public:
    virtual void f()
    {
        b.f();
    }
private:
    B b;
}

Implement C by deriving from A_Impl:

class C: public A_Impl
{
};

Or, if you only want to show A in the inheritance hierarchy, derive publicly from A and privately from A_Impl:

class C: public A, private virtual A_Impl
{
};
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So, you have 100 pure virtual functions in A, implementations of those functions in B, and you want to avoid writing re-implementing all those functions in C to call B. There's no way to get the compiler to use B's implementation's automatically. Instead of fighting with the compiler (you'll lose every time!), rethink the inheritance graph. Maybe make B a subclass of A and then derive C from B. Or factor the 100 methods out of B and into a concrete subclass of A.

Programming is the art of solving problems within the constraints provided by your tools. When you find yourself at odds with your tools, you need to either reconsider your approach to the problem or use different tools.

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The question says that B can't be touched, so you can't make it a subclass of A, and you can't move methods out of it. –  Karu Apr 13 '12 at 11:19
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