Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

A toy example but still frustrating:

numberMapper:: IO ()
numberMapper = do codes <- forM [1 .. 4] (\num ->
                   do putStrLn $ "Enter a code for " ++ show num
                       code <- getLine
                       return code)
                   let numberCodes = zip [1 .. 4] codes
                   in forM numberCodes (\(num,code) ->
                   putStrLn $ "Got code " ++ show code ++ " for " ++ show num)

ghci tells me I have a Parse error in pattern: putStrLn and I can't figure out why it should fail to parse.

share|improve this question
1  
Ok, this works if I add braces for the do blocks and semicolons at the end of each 'statement' -- but is that the recommended solution ? (it seems a little un-functional :P) –  agam Apr 10 '12 at 8:13
    
You can pretend that the semicolons and braces are already there, but invisible. (There are rules for where the automatic braces and semicolons go.) –  Dietrich Epp Apr 10 '12 at 8:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Correction:

numberMapper:: IO ()
numberMapper = do
    codes <- forM [1 .. 4] $ \num -> do
        putStrLn $ "Enter a code for " ++ show num
        getLine
    let numberCodes = zip [1 .. 4] codes
    forM_ numberCodes $ \(num,code) ->
        putStrLn $ "Got code " ++ show code ++ " for " ++ show num

Fix: The lines inside a do block should line up.

-- wrong
a = do codes <- something
        let numberCodes = zip [1..4] codes

-- right
a = do codes <- something
       let numberCodes = zip [1..4] codes

Fix 2: When using let inside a do block, don't use in.

-- wrong
func = do
    let x = 17
    in print x

-- right
func = do
    let x = 17
    print x

Fix 3: Use forM_ (which returns (), a.k.a. void) instead of forM (which returns a list).

codes <- forM [1..4] func...  -- returns a list
forM_ numberCodes $ ...       -- discards list, returns () 

So forM_ could (almost) be written like this:

forM_ xs f = do forM xs f
                return ()

Minor change: You don't need return here:

do func1
   x <- func2
   return x

You can change it to the equivalent,

do func1
   func2 -- value of func2 is returned
share|improve this answer
    
Wow ... thanks !! –  agam Apr 10 '12 at 20:58

You over-indent lines in your do-blocks. Furthermore, you don't need an in for let statements in do-blocks.

This works for me:

numberMapper:: IO ()
numberMapper = do codes <- forM [1 .. 4] (\num ->
                   do putStrLn $ "Enter a code for " ++ show num
                      code <- getLine
                      return code)
                  let numberCodes = zip [1 .. 4] codes
                  forM numberCodes (\(num,code) ->
                    putStrLn $ "Got code " ++ show code ++ " for " ++ show num)

You can also structure it like this:

numberMapper:: IO ()
numberMapper = do codes <- forM [1 .. 4] $ \num ->
                   do putStrLn $ "Enter a code for " ++ show num
                      code <- getLine
                      return code
                  let numberCodes = zip [1 .. 4] codes
                  forM numberCodes $ \(num,code) ->
                    putStrLn $ "Got code " ++ show code ++ " for " ++ show num

(which lets you avoid the parentheses; alternatively, put the do at the end of the \num -> and line up subsequent statements)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.