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I want to pass a self-reference down to an instantiated class (the child should have access to the parent). It works if everything is in one file like this:

class ClassB:
  def __init__(self, name, parent):
    assert isinstance(parent, ClassA)
    self.name = name
    self.parent = parent
    print('my parent is', parent.name)

class ClassA:
  def __init__(self, name):
    self.name = name
    self.b = ClassB('child', self)

a = ClassA('parent')

output is my parent is parent as expected

The 2-file version is this:

class ClassB:
  def __init__(self, name, parent):
    from ClassA import ClassA
    assert isinstance(parent, ClassA)
    self.name = name
    self.parent = parent
    print('my parent is', parent.name)

and:

from ClassB import ClassB

class ClassA:
  def __init__(self, name):
    self.name = name
    self.b = ClassB('myName', self)

if __name__ == '__main__':
  a = ClassA('parent')

output is assert isinstance(parent, ClassA) AssertionError

share|improve this question
    
your file classB.py have no reference of ClassA –  avasal Apr 10 '12 at 8:32
1  
it imports ClassA in the __init__ function. Otherwise the importing wouldn't work. –  HWende Apr 10 '12 at 8:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

That's because the second passes a __main__.ClassA, whereas ClassB expects a ClassA.ClassA. Find a different way of doing this, such as putting ClassA in its own module.

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Deleting the if doesn't help. –  HWende Apr 10 '12 at 8:31
2  
The if has absolutely nothing to do with it. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 10 '12 at 8:32
    
I stand corrected. When I put the instanciation of ClassA into another file, it works. Can you explain what the difference is? –  HWende Apr 10 '12 at 8:35
2  
The difference is that the script you run becomes the __main__ module. This is why its name is "__main__". –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 10 '12 at 8:39
    
...and other modules that use THIS module get confused with its name? I see. Thank you. –  HWende Apr 10 '12 at 8:40
class ClassB:
  def __init__(self, name, parent, ClassA):
    assert isinstance(parent, ClassA)
    self.name = name
    self.parent = parent
    print('my parent is', parent.name)

and:

from ClassB import ClassB

class ClassA:
  def __init__(self, name):
    self.name = name
    self.b = ClassB('myName', self, ClassA)

if __name__ == '__main__':
  a = ClassA('parent')

This works for me, but i don't know if it's what you are looking for.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't see the point in this. If the caller wants to cheat, they can do it in your way. Then it would be better just to omit the assert check altogether... –  glglgl Apr 10 '12 at 8:51

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