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I've some class with these methods:

public class TestClass
{

    public void method1()
    {
        // this method will be used for consuming MyClass1
    }

    public void method2()
    {
        // this method will be used for consuming MyClass2
    }
}

and classes:

public class MyClass1
{
}

public class MyClass2
{
}

and I want HashMap<Class<?>, "question"> where I would store (key: class, value: method) pairs like this ( class "type" is associated with method )

hashmp.add(Myclass1.class, "question");

and I want to know how to add method references to HashMap (replace "question").

p.s. I've come from C# where I simply write Dictionary<Type, Action> :)

share|improve this question
    
Thanks to all :) –  Nightwish91 Apr 10 '12 at 12:09

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This is feature which is likely to be Java 8. For now the simplest way to do this is to use reflection.

public class TestClass {
    public void method(MyClass1 o) {
        // this method will be used for consuming MyClass1
    }

    public void method(MyClass2 o) {
        // this method will be used for consuming MyClass2
    }
}

and call it using

Method m = TestClass.class.getMethod("method", type);
share|improve this answer

Now that Java 8 is out I thought I'd update this question with how to do this in Java 8.

package com.sandbox;

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

public class Sandbox {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Map<Class, Runnable> dict = new HashMap<>();

        MyClass1 myClass1 = new MyClass1();
        dict.put(MyClass1.class, myClass1::sideEffects);

        MyClass2 myClass2 = new MyClass2();
        dict.put(MyClass2.class, myClass2::sideEffects);

        for (Map.Entry<Class, Runnable> classRunnableEntry : dict.entrySet()) {
            System.out.println("Running a method from " + classRunnableEntry.getKey().getName());
            classRunnableEntry.getValue().run();
        }
    }

    public static class MyClass1 {
        public void sideEffects() {
            System.out.println("MyClass1");
        }
    }

    public static class MyClass2 {
        public void sideEffects() {
            System.out.println("MyClass2");
        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer

Use interfaces instead of function pointers. So define an interface which defines the function you want to call and then call the interface as in example above. To implement the interface you can use anonymous inner class.

void DoSomething(IQuestion param) {
    // ...
    param.question();
}
share|improve this answer

While you can store java.lang.reflect.Method objects in your map, I would advise against this: you still need to pass the object that is used as the this reference upon invocation, and using raw strings for method names may pose problems in refactoring.

The cannonical way of doing this is to extract an interface (or use an existing one) and use anonymous classes for storing:

map.add(MyClass1.class, new Runnable() {
  public void run() {
    MyClass1.staticMethod();
  }
});

I must admit that this is much more verbose than the C#-variant, but it is Java's common practice - e.g. when doing event handling with Listeners. However, other languages that build upon the JVM usually have shorthand notations for such handlers. By using the interface-approach, your code is compatible with Groovy, Jython, or JRuby and it is still typesafe.

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"you still need to pass the object that is used as the this reference"... actually not needed if it's a static method, then you can just pass in null –  Magnus Jul 18 '12 at 20:40
Method method = TestClass.class.getMethod("method name", type)
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