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Hi, I am a beginner to the programming world, i want to know how to avoid changing the value of a const variable.

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
 const int i = 10;
 int * p = &i;
 *p = 20;
 printf("*p = %d\ni = %d\n", *p,i);
 printf("%u\n%u\n",&i, p);
 return 0;
}

here in above program i am getting only warning but no error while i am assigning value to const field via pointer, but when i print the out isn't different:

*p = 20
i = 10
3210723532
3210723532

so then what is the use of getting pointer to const when it is not change able.

share|improve this question
1  
Which compiler do you use? –  larsmans Apr 10 '12 at 9:19
1  
gcc v4.5.2 on linux gives me the output of *p = 20 i = 20, It's strange that your output is different. –  majie Apr 10 '12 at 9:21
    
Just never ignore a warning. The C language only specifies that a "diagnostic" must be issued. Warnings are as severe as errors. –  Jens Gustedt Apr 10 '12 at 11:51
    
@JensGustedt: Some warnings are not required by the language at all though, and are simply an annoyance (for example "Suggest parantheses around assignment used as truth value"). –  caf Apr 10 '12 at 14:10
    
@majie: Try with optimisation. –  caf Apr 10 '12 at 14:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The C standard uses only the term "diagnostic". There is no distinction between warnings and errors.

The conversion of const int * to int * without a cast is a constraint violation that requires a diagnostic.

This puts it in the same category as a syntax error: your code is not a valid ISO C program and the behavior is undefined if it is translated anyway and executed.

Unfortunately, many compilers do not distinguish required diagnostics from extra diagnostics that they add, and what is worse, they sometimes required diagnostics as warnings. This is allowed: the C standard doesn't say that programs which require a diagnostic must be prevented from translating and executing. By emitting a warning, a compiler satisfies the requirement for diagnosis and that is that.

Another issue is that many C compilers do not even accept the standard ISO C dialect unless they are asked to, but instead accept their own dialect, which may have nonconforming (i.e. not backward compatible) extensions.

The GNU C compiler understands a C dialect called GNU C 89, if you don't give it any dialect options.

So, ironically, in this dialect, it is a mere warning to convert const int * to int * without a cast, whereas certain legal C90 programs are completely rejected.

So basically you always have to understand how to control the input dialect of your compiler, and follow up on all the warnings, which you have to understand, by yourself, whether they are real violations of the language, or just the whims of the compiler writers ("suggest parentheses around this expression").

It's not a bad idea to compile with gcc -Wall -W -ansi (if you're programming in the C90; or -std=c99 instead of ansi for C99) and ensure that there are no warnings. Not even the stylistic ones which suggest extra parentheses and such. If you're not disciplined enough to follow up on warnings add -Werror to turn them into errors that fail your build. Some would also recommend -pedantic.

If you follow this discipline, the subversion of a const int will not sneak into your codebase.

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First of all, the compiler will give the warning because of the code int * p = &i;

and the value of i is not changed, because the compile optimize the code,I use the gcc to test the code :

if I use the gcc -O0 const.c -o const , O0 represents no compiler optimization, the result is

*p = 20
i = 20
1114013412
1114013412

but when i use the gcc -O2 const.c -o const, O2represents the compiler optimization, the result is

*p = 20
i = 10
1262279764
1262279764

So, the compiler knows that the type of i is const , and replaces i by 10 at compile time itself, and hence the code becomes

 printf("*p = %d\ni = %d\n", *p,10);

Also you can use gcc -S const.c to look into the assembly code.

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+1 for showing changes when optimization level is changed –  Pavan Manjunath Apr 10 '12 at 9:38

The C language standard (almost) never requires compilers to reject incorrect code. If you write something illegal and the compiler merely warns you about it, the compiler has done its job as far as the C language standard is concerned.

You need to take compiler warnings very seriously. If your code compiles without warnings or errors, then it's probably legal (which doesn't mean it will actually work!).

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While you're technically correct, what OP should do instead is get a better compiler. –  avakar Apr 10 '12 at 9:19
    
is there any way so that i want to avoid using pointer to change const variable value. –  user954299 Apr 10 '12 at 9:21
    
@avakar: That may not be practical. But gcc, though it issues warnings for a lot of invalid constructs, has the -Werror option that turns warnings into fatal errors. –  Keith Thompson Apr 10 '12 at 9:22
    
+1, it also issues warnings for a lot of valid constructs;) –  ouah Apr 10 '12 at 9:23
    
@user954299: If you don't want to change a const object, then just don't change it. The compiler warned you about it. Change your code so you don't get any warnings, and you (probably) won't be changing any consts. If you change int *p = &i; to const int *p = &i;, you'll avoid the warning on that line and get a new diagnostic on *p = 20;. Bottom line: Take warnings very seriously. –  Keith Thompson Apr 10 '12 at 9:25

Make it a #define instead.

Objects declared const are not constant in the english meaning of the term, they are "read-only".

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
 #define I 10
 int * p = &I; // illegal &I
 *p = 20;
 printf("*p = %d\nI = %d\n", *p,I);
 printf("%u\n%u\n",&I, p); // illegal &I
 return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Yes, objects declared const are constant in the English meaning of the term. What the program is doing is undefined behavior as a result of breaking a rule for which a diagnostic is required (and was issued!) Recommending #define instead of const is poor advice. You duped the poor newbie into accepting a crap answer. –  Kaz Apr 10 '12 at 10:41
1  
Oh, and you can #undef I and then #define I 13. Is that the English meaning of constant? –  Kaz Apr 10 '12 at 10:43
    
Beware also that I is a predefined macro in <complex.h>. –  Jens Gustedt Apr 10 '12 at 11:49

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