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This is my first time around, so i would appreciate your patience with what might appear as a lame looking question :)

I'm trying to write a function called do_n that takes a function object and a number, n, as arguments and then call the given function n times. Here's the code:

def name():
    print 'Jack'

def do_n(fo, x):
    if x <= 0:
        return
    print fo
    (fo, x-1)

When making a function call from within main:

do_n(name, 3)

I get the following outcome:

<function name at 0x01F93AF0>

I'm trying to get the program to print out:

Jack
Jack
Jack

Many thanks in advance

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This question comes from 'Think Python' by Allen B. Downey. The question and its context can be found at: greenteapress.com/thinkpython/html/thinkpython006.html –  ewm Apr 16 at 2:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are neither calling the function, nor are you actually doing the recursive call. Corrected version:

def name():
    print 'Jack'

def do_n(fo, x):
    if x <= 0:
        return
    fo()
    do_n(fo, x - 1)

To call a function n times, you'd usually use a for loop instead of tail recursion in Python:

for dummy in range(10):
    name()
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Wonderful! Thanks for the clarification mate. –  basboosa Apr 10 '12 at 10:11
    
Is there a cleaner way than this? The dummy variable is unused... –  Har Apr 2 '14 at 15:54
1  
@user1932405: That's why it's called dummy. I actually think it's perfectly readable. You could do stuff like map(apply, repeat(name, 10)) (Python 2.x, repeat from itertools) to avoid excplicitly mentioning the counter variable. Of course this would create an internal counter variable anyway, and also a useless list of return values. To be honest, I never came across a use case for simply calling a parameterless function 10 times, so all this might be a bit academic anyway. –  Sven Marnach Apr 2 '14 at 17:12

Functions are first-class objects in Python.

fo()
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