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I'm new to c and I'm trying to write a c program that get 10 integer values entered from keyboard using scanf and then print them using printf but the result is not correct. Here is the code:

   #include<stdio.h>
    #include<conio.h>
    main(){
     int x[10];
     printf("\n\n\t\t PRGRAM THAT CAPTURES AND PRINTS 10 SCORES");
     for(int i=1;i<=10;i++){
     printf("\n\tEnter Score %d", i);
     scanf("%d",x);
    }
     printf("\n\t The entered scores are: %d",x[i]);
     return(0);
    }

the output given is a four digit number like 8731 yet I expect something like 1234567890. some help please

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try this:

    #include<stdio.h>
    #include<conio.h>
    int main(){
     int x[10];
     printf("\n\n\t\t PRGRAM THAT CAPTURES AND PRINTS 10 SCORES");
     for(int i=0;i<10;i++){ //Change 1
         printf("\n\tEnter Score %d", i);
         scanf("%d",&x[i]); //Change 2
      }
     //Change 3
     for (int i=0; i<10; i++) 
         printf("\n\t The entered scores are: %d",x[i]);
     return(0);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Btw, this is not C but a 'C++' code, so it might not compile on a C compiler – sowrov Apr 10 '12 at 10:02
    
Thank you so much. Your code gave an error of multiple declaration of i which I fixed and all is fine now. What do you mean this is not "c" code? – ken Apr 10 '12 at 10:22
    
The error you get is because you most probably using an nonstandard compiler, because int i declaration in the for loop should be only in the scope of that for loop. – sowrov Apr 10 '12 at 10:36
    
And it is not C code because in pure C all the variables should be declared at the beginning of the method, you can not declare them when you need it, this is only allowed in C++ – sowrov Apr 10 '12 at 10:38

You need to make a new for loop to display the values, just like you do when reading them.

PS: format your code better, you'll thank it later.

PS2: try to avoid conio.h, it's not standard, and you don't even need it for your code.

PS3: also your code is wrong. Should be for(int i=0;i<10;i++). Arrays go from 0 to size-1, not from 1 to size. The C compiler will not warn you that i[10] is an invalid index for your array.

share|improve this answer
    
can you give me a sample? – ken Apr 10 '12 at 9:59
    
I could but I won't. It's very similar to your for reading loop. Try to make it yourself, it's a good exercise for you being a beginner. – m0skit0 Apr 10 '12 at 10:03
   #include<stdio.h>
    #include<conio.h>

The header <conio.h> is not standard. You get better portability if you don't use it. Anyway, your program doesn't use anything from it.

    main(){

The function main() returns an int. Get into the habit of saying so explicitly (and you might also get into the habit of objectively specifying it takes no parameters).

     int x[10];
     printf("\n\n\t\t PRGRAM THAT CAPTURES AND PRINTS 10 SCORES");

For better working of printf() in all implementation, end each one with a '\n'. Otherwise the output might appear out of order.

     for(int i=1;i<=10;i++){
     printf("\n\tEnter Score %d", i);
     scanf("%d",x);

Trying to always read to the same position in the array in a loop?

    }
     printf("\n\t The entered scores are: %d",x[i]);

The element x[i] does not exist. At this point in the code, i is larger than the largest legal array index.

     return(0);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Also: for(int i=1;i<=10;i++) – m0skit0 Apr 10 '12 at 18:50

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