Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I want to show in a view the tasks for a day in concrete (today). these tasks have an estimated time that must sum 6 hours per day.

in the model I have this method:

def self.tasks_for_today
  total_time = 0
  r = Array.new
  all(:conditions => "finished = 0").each do | t |
    total_time += t.estimated_time
    r << t if total_time <= 6
  end  
  r 
end

and works fine, but I need the "r" variable to be a instance of a Tasks model, not a instance of Array class...

How can I do that?

share|improve this question
    
How do you mean? tasks_for_today should (and does) return an array of Tasks. You want a collection of tasks, not a singular task. Can you clarify exactly how this differs from what you want? – Ben Hughes Jun 17 '09 at 18:25
    
Yes, tasks_for_today return an Array of Tasks, but I want to return it as an instance of ActiveRecord, just like the find method... – Amed Rodriguez Jun 17 '09 at 18:50
    
#find returns a collection of instances actually, not an instance. I think that's why we're confused. – Jon Smock Jun 17 '09 at 18:53
    
I assume you want to do something later with this, like Tasks.tasks_for_today.first, or something like that? - I've always struggled with the best way to do that. – Jon Smock Jun 17 '09 at 18:55
    
Yes, later I execute Task.task_for_today.each do | t | ... end. that method must return a set of tasks that together sum a total of 6 hours... – Amed Rodriguez Jun 17 '09 at 18:59
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your method will return an array of tasks and Task.all also returns an array of tasks. Try it:

>> Task.all.class
=> Array

And with any array you can do things like:

t.first
t.each {|a| ... }

What you exactly want to do with your result?

share|improve this answer

One refactor you might do already is to use a named_scoped for your unfinished tasks:

class Shirt < ActiveRecord::Base
  named_scope :unfinished, :conditions => {:finished => false}
end

You don't really want to return an instance (an instance means just one task).

You might be able to order your tasks, get a running sum, and then return only the tasks that have a running sum below 6. I have to think about it more, but if you do it that way, you'll end up using find_by_sql and SQL magic provided by your DB engine of choice.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, i want to select a set of tasks that together sum a total of 6 hours... the method that I write does that, but return an instance of Array and I need to be Activerecord, just like Model.all – Amed Rodriguez Jun 17 '09 at 18:56
    
Yeah, I was trying to use a named_scope somehow, because you can keep scoping it and use it just like ActiveRecord (ex. Tasks.unfinished.older_than(3.days)) – Jon Smock Jun 17 '09 at 18:58

Thanks guys, it was my mistake, the method does what I want...

Here is the final code:

def self.tasks_for_today
  total_time = 0
  r = Array.new
  all(:conditions => "finished = 0").each do | t |
    total_time += t.estimated_time
    total_time <= 6 ? r << t : break
  end
  r
end
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.