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i have an array list of type String[]. i want to order it by String[0] as a int. i have this:

Collections.sort(listitems, new Comparator<String[]>() {
 @Override
 public int compare(String[] lhs, String[] rhs) {
  return lhs[0].compareToIgnoreCase(rhs[0]);
 }
});

but this order like this:
10
11
12
2
20
21
3
4
5
i have tried to convert the lhs[0] and rhs[0] to int, but the int type doesn't have any kind of compare and i'm not sure what type of int i need to return

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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The result from compare is meant to be:

  • Negative if the first argument is logically "less than" the second
  • Positive if the first argument is logically "more than" the second
  • Zero if the first argument is logically equal to the second

So if you're sure that the first string of each array is parsable as an integer, I'd use:

@Override
public int compare(String[] lhs, String[] rhs) {
    int leftInt = Integer.parseInt(lhs[0]);
    int rightInt = Integer.parseInt(rhs[0]);
    return leftInt < rightInt ? -1
        : leftInt > rightInt ? 1
        : 0;
}

Java 1.7 has the helpful Integer.compare method, but I assume that won't be available to you. You could use Integer.compareTo but that may create more garbage than you really want on a mobile device...

Note that this will work even when leftInt and rightInt are very large, or possibly negative - the solution of just subtracting one value from another assumes that the subtraction won't overflow.

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Integer.parseInt(lhs); - you try to parse an array - it will not work –  Vyacheslav Shilkin Apr 10 '12 at 11:03
    
+1 And note that one also has to be sure each array is non-empty. –  Paul Bellora Apr 10 '12 at 11:03
    
int leftInt = Integer.parseInt(lhs[0]); int rightInt = Integer.parseInt(rhs[0]); –  user370305 Apr 10 '12 at 11:04
    
@appserv: Yup, fixed thanks. –  Jon Skeet Apr 10 '12 at 11:04
    
@PaulBellora: Oh yes, all kinds of things could go wrong in terms of a value being null, the array being empty, or it not being a valid integer. –  Jon Skeet Apr 10 '12 at 11:05

I think this should do the work for you, if we assume that the contents of the arrays are string representations of integers:

Collections.sort(listitems, new Comparator<String[]>() {
 @Override
 public int compare(String[] lhs, String[] rhs) {
  return Integer.valueOf(lhs[0]).compareTo(Integer.valueOf(rhs[0]));
 }
});
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You comparison is based on the alphabetical ordering of the number. To compare them numerically:

Integer.parseInt(lhs[0]) - Integer.parseInt(rhs[0]);
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Did you try compiling this? –  Jon Skeet Apr 10 '12 at 10:56
    
it works, thanks –  João Melo Apr 10 '12 at 10:58
3  
It won't work if you end up with overflow. For example if lhs[0] is "-2147483648" and rhs[0] is "1". –  Jon Skeet Apr 10 '12 at 10:59

You can try Integer.parseInt(1hs[0])-Integer.parseInt(rhs[0]);

or

int compareTo(Integer anotherInteger) sytnax

or

decode(String nm)

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