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I've got a table: items(id,description). In my program I get as input a list of words (word1 to wordN) and I need to calculate how many of those words appear in each of the descriptions in the table, and sort the results based on that number. Here is my solution, but I would welcome suggestions on how to improve the performance. Thanks.

SELECT x, COUNT(*) 
FROM (SELECT description as x, id FROM items where description LIKE '%word1%'
      UNION ALL
      SELECT description as x, id FROM items where description LIKE '%word2%'
      UNION ALL
       ...
      UNION ALL
      SELECT description as x, id FROM items where description LIKE '%wordN%')
GROUP BY (id)
ORDER BY COUNT(*) DESC
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2 Answers 2

If you look at the execution plan, you are probably seeing a separate table scan for each of those SELECTs you have union'd together. As you are doing a search with a wildcard prefix to the term, it means the query is non-sargable - so even if there is an index on description column, it won't be able to make use of it, hence the scans.

You can can this down to only scan the table once, instead of n times, by combining the conditions into one:

SELECT description as x, id 
FROM items 
WHERE description LIKE '%word1%'
    OR description LIKE '%word2%'
    OR description LIKE '%wordn%'

Running this should show you now, an execution plan with a single table scan so it's doing the matching all in one sweep.

However, your original query is slightly different as it appears to be ranking the results based on how many of those terms an item matches on. So it may be worth looking into Full Text Search for both performance and functional reasons.

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+1 I think text indexing is the only way of improving the performance of this puppy, unless Parallel Query is an option. –  APC Apr 10 '12 at 11:27
    
Thanks. I was afraid of that. I'll take a look at FTS. –  SAL PIMIENTA Apr 10 '12 at 12:28
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SELECT x, COUNT(*) 
FROM (SELECT description as x, id FROM items where description LIKE '%word1%' 
       or description LIKE '%word2%'
       or description LIKE '%wordN%')
GROUP BY (id)
ORDER BY COUNT(*) DESC

This should be better...

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This produces a different resultset: if two Words matched one Description the original query would count 2 whereas yours will count 1. –  APC Apr 10 '12 at 11:22
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