Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a spring injected service

 class A{
      List l = new ArrayList();

      public m1(){
           //do some additions in list 
      }

      public m2(){
           //do some new additions in list
      }
 }

Now because creating of objects of A, is in the hands of spring the behavior of program is not what is expected. (I expect list to be available empty always but not initialized by methods for some wired reason)

Will Spring always create only one instance of A, so that list l will keep on growing, I have configured bean as singleton in application context.

If yes, naturally I must initialize the list inside the functions m1 & m2 or callee must past the reference, and in my case callee being struts2 actions they are not singleton so this issue can be solved?

Or

Does spring provide any support in configuration to initialize member variables at every call or something else?

More generally what are best practices to have in writing services injected by spring about using member variables/ local variables for performance & efficiency.

share|improve this question
    
Spring provides a number of ways to initialize an object; have you read any of the Spring documentation? If it's a singleton, and you only create objects via Spring, there will be only one--that's what a singleton is. –  Dave Newton Apr 10 '12 at 10:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Trying to answer following : Does spring provide any support in configuration to initialize member variables at every call or something else?

By default Spring beans are singleton. Initialized only once and use the same object again and again.

However, if requirement changes as you asked. You need to understand scope attribute provided by the Spring.

<bean id="id" class="com.test.TP" scope="prototype">
</bean>

Refer following for detail understanding. Scope Description

  • singleton

    Scopes a single bean definition to a single object instance per Spring IoC container.

  • prototype

    Scopes a single bean definition to any number of object instances.

  • request

    Scopes a single bean definition to the lifecycle of a single HTTP request; that is each and every HTTP request will have its own instance of a bean created off the back of a single bean definition. Only valid in the context of a web-aware Spring ApplicationContext.

  • session

    Scopes a single bean definition to the lifecycle of a HTTP Session. Only valid in the context of a web-aware Spring ApplicationContext.

  • global session

    Scopes a single bean definition to the lifecycle of a global HTTP Session. Typically only valid when used in a portlet context. Only valid in the context of a web-aware Spring ApplicationContext.

http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.0.0.M3/spring-framework-reference/html/ch04s04.html

It is also possible to have user defined scope such as thread scope.

share|improve this answer

You can configure your bean as follows:-

<bean id = "serviceBeanA" class = "somepkg.A" scope="prototype">
    <property name = "l">
        <value>
            <list>
                 <value>ABC</value>
                 .....
            </list>
        </value>
    </property>
</bean>
share|improve this answer
    
ok, so if i configure l, to new list here? will every call have an empty list? –  Amol Ghotankar Apr 10 '12 at 11:13
    
no, it will have values populated from <list> values... </list> –  rohit Apr 10 '12 at 18:50

I'm not sure if I understand the question but your sample class should work fine with spring. Spring will call the default constructor unless you pass in constructor args in the configuration file. As long as you have an id="..." in the bean then it will create a singleton of that class. Then, the first class that calls a.m1() will see l as being an empty list.

What may be happening is that you have multiple instances of A being created. See here about Spring singletons versus non. To quote:

Beans are defined to be deployed in one of two modes: singleton or non-singleton. (The latter is also called a prototype, although the term is used loosely as it doesn't quite fit). When a bean is a singleton, only one shared instance of the bean will be managed and all requests for beans with an id or ids matching that bean definition will result in that one specific bean instance being returned.

So if you don't have an id or name specified in your Spring configuration then you might get multiple instances of A created.

The non-singleton, prototype mode of a bean deployment results in the creation of a new bean instance every time a request for that specific bean is done. This is ideal for situations where for example each user needs an independent user object or something similar.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.