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Process log_remover = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("echo \"bleh\" > test.txt");
log_remover.waitFor();
log_remover.destroy();

this does nothing

Process node_creation = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("cp -r ../HLR"+String.valueOf(count-1)+" ../HLR"+String.valueOf(count));
node_creation.waitFor();
node_creation.destroy();

however this works :S

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closed as not a real question by casperOne Apr 11 '12 at 14:16

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
And what is the question? – Alex Stybaev Apr 10 '12 at 12:07
    
lol y is it so? – Atish Deepank Apr 10 '12 at 12:11

The redirection works only if a shell is used. Runtime.exec() does not use a shell.

See Java Executing Linux Command

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hmmm yeah true.. thanks man.. the link helped out – Atish Deepank Apr 10 '12 at 12:13

Redirection is handled by a shell, and you're not invoking a shell here, so you can't use redirection. Something like this, on the other hand, would work:

Runtime.getRuntime().exec(new String[] {"sh",  "-c", "echo 'bleh' > text.txt"});

Note I've changed this to use the form of exec() that takes an array of Strings, as properly tokenizing quoted strings on a command line is something else that only the shell can do!

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nope didnt work – Atish Deepank Apr 10 '12 at 12:15
    
y have u put a -c @Ernest Friedman-Hill? if its for shell im using a korn shell – Atish Deepank Apr 10 '12 at 12:19
    
Process log_remover = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("log_remover.sh"); Why isnt this working – Atish Deepank Apr 10 '12 at 12:51
    
I don't know. Is log_remover.sh executable? Is it on your PATH ? – Ernest Friedman-Hill Apr 10 '12 at 13:16

Classic mistake I've seen many times before...

The first argument to Runtime.getRuntime().exec() is the executable, so your code is trying to execute a command literally called echo \"bleh\" > test.txt, but it should be trying to execute echo. Arguments to executables are passed in after the executable, like this:

Runtime.getRuntime().exec("echo", new String[]{"bleh"});

Redirecting output is another story, because the *nix operator > is a shell thing. To replicate this in java you have to get the outputstream of the command and pump it to the inputstream of another process

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find ./HLR3/LOGS -name '*.txt' -exec rm {} \; how can i execute this @Bohemian – Atish Deepank Apr 10 '12 at 12:29
    
listen chutiye bohemian , can u reply? – Atish Deepank Apr 10 '12 at 12:44
    
Process log_remover = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("log_remover.sh"); this doesnt work – Atish Deepank Apr 10 '12 at 12:49
    
use the absolute path, eg Runtime.getRuntime().exec("/usr/bin/log_remover.sh") or whatever it is. The java exec environment isn't the same as your shell. – Bohemian Apr 10 '12 at 15:42

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