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I am doing some program, and so far so good when it's about implementation, however now I am stuck with trivial problem, but I am in no position to find a solution for it. The problem is in this part of the code, and it say

Error 1 error C2662: 'Smetler::action' : cannot convert 'this' pointer from 'const Smetler' to 'Smetler &'

Anyone knows what's the problem here is, since I am sure I applied all what it was been said.

  virtual void action()
  {
    std::cout << "I'm a copy" << copy() << ". Doing observations." << std::endl;
  }      
  Smetler* copy() const { return new Smetler (*this); }     
   private:
   void writeDown(ostream& wd) const                            
   { 
      wd << Worker::getOccupation() << " " << Worker::getName() << ',' <<  Worker::getPosition()  << action(); 
   }
   };

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
First of all, you meant to write return new Smetler (*this); Also, this is NOT a good programming style. You will definitely get memory leaks sooner or later. Use smart pointers! –  Violet Giraffe Apr 10 '12 at 12:30
    
Also, you didn't supply relevant piece of code. –  Violet Giraffe Apr 10 '12 at 12:32
    
Yep, it was mistake done while writing it here . It's about 3000 lines of code, the thing is he weeps about it here, so I have posted that part of the code. –  Serenity Stack Holder Apr 10 '12 at 12:33
    
@Serenity Stack Holder: What line number does the C2662 refer to, exactly? –  In silico Apr 10 '12 at 12:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You have this:

Smetler* copy() const { return new Smetler* (*this); }    

This doesn't allocate a Smetler object. It allocates a pointer of type Smetler. You're attempting to convert a const Smetler& (which is the type of *this in const functions) to a Smetler*, which of course doesn't make a whole lot of sense.

What you probably want is this:

Smetler* copy() const { return new Smetler(*this); }

The above will allocate a new Smetler on the free store and copies the this object into the new space. You have to delete the returned pointer eventually to avoid memory leaks.

What you really want is to use a smart pointer so you won't have to worry about delete-ing the returned pointer from copy(). In C++03, you can use std::auto_ptr (although it has been deprecated since it can accidentally be used in an unsafe situation e.g. you can't use auto_ptrs in containers like std::vector):

std::auto_ptr<Smetler> copy() const
{
    return std::auto_ptr<Smetler>(new Smetler(*this));
}

Or, if you can use C++11, use the much more superior std::unique_ptr which doesn't have any of auto_ptr's problems.

std::unique_ptr<Smetler> copy() const
{
    return std::unique_ptr<Smetler>(new Smetler(*this));
}

Both the above code snippets will help a long way with preventing memory leaks (and not having to worry about them in the first place!)

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it was misspell while writing here, that's what I have been truly writing. Thing about smart pointer is nice, so I will try it. :) –  Serenity Stack Holder Apr 10 '12 at 12:32
    
Thanks that's exactly what I have been looking for. :) –  Serenity Stack Holder Apr 10 '12 at 12:40

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