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Here is my table and the data contained in it:

Table: first

+----------+------+
| first_id | data |
+----------+------+
|        1 |    5 |
|        2 |    6 |
|        3 |    7 |
|        4 |    6 |
|        5 |    7 |
|        6 |    5 |
|        7 |    7 |
|        8 |    6 |
|        9 |    5 |
|       10 |    7 |
+----------+------+

Table: second
+-----------+----------+----------+
| second_id | first_id | third_id |
+-----------+----------+----------+
|         1 |        1 |        2 |
|         2 |        2 |        3 |
|         3 |        3 |        4 |
|         4 |        4 |        2 |
|         5 |        5 |        3 |
|         6 |        6 |        4 |
|         7 |        7 |        2 |
|         8 |        8 |        2 |
|         9 |        9 |        4 |
|        10 |       10 |        4 |
+-----------+----------+----------+

My intention is to get the list of third_ids ordered by data field. Now, I ran the following query for that.

SELECT
    third_id, data
FROM 
    first f JOIN second s ON ( s.first_id = f.first_id )
ORDER BY 
    data ASC;

And I get the following result as expected.

+----------+------+
| third_id | data |
+----------+------+
|        4 |    5 |
|        2 |    5 |
|        4 |    5 |
|        2 |    6 |
|        3 |    6 |
|        2 |    6 |
|        2 |    7 |
|        4 |    7 |
|        4 |    7 |
|        3 |    7 |
+----------+------+

The following query is also work as expected.

SELECT 
    third_id
FROM 
    first f JOIN second s ON ( s.first_id = f.first_id )
ORDER BY 
    data ASC;

with output

+----------+
| third_id |
+----------+
|        4 |
|        2 |
|        4 |
|        2 |
|        3 |
|        2 |
|        2 |
|        4 |
|        4 |
|        3 |
+----------+

Then I ran the following.

SELECT DISTINCT
    third_id
FROM 
    first f JOIN second s ON ( s.first_id = f.first_id )
ORDER BY 
    data ASC;

But, here I get an unexpected result:

+----------+
| third_id |
+----------+
|        2 |
|        3 |
|        4 |
+----------+

Here, 3 must be after 2 and 4, since I am ordering on the data field. What am I doing wrong? Or do I have to go for a different strategy.

Note: This scenario happens on my project. The tables provided here doesn't belong to original database. It is created by me to explain the problem. Original tables contain thousands of rows. I am inserting database dump if you would like to experiment with the data:

--
-- Table structure for table `first`
--

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `first` (
  `first_id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `data` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`first_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=11 ;

--
-- Dumping data for table `first`
--

INSERT INTO `first` (`first_id`, `data`) VALUES
(1, 5),
(2, 6),
(3, 7),
(4, 6),
(5, 7),
(6, 5),
(7, 7),
(8, 6),
(9, 5),
(10, 7);
--
-- Table structure for table `second`
--

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `second` (
  `second_id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `first_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `third_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`second_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=11 ;

--
-- Dumping data for table `second`
--

INSERT INTO `second` (`second_id`, `first_id`, `third_id`) VALUES
(1, 1, 2),
(2, 2, 3),
(3, 3, 4),
(4, 4, 2),
(5, 5, 3),
(6, 6, 4),
(7, 7, 2),
(8, 8, 2),
(9, 9, 4),
(10, 10, 4);
share|improve this question
4  
"But, here I get an unexpected result:" - That is not unexpected. –  Mitch Wheat Apr 10 '12 at 12:31
    
@MitchWheat But how? –  Jomoos Apr 10 '12 at 12:33
1  
If I were sql, I'd reject this ORDER BY clause, but mysql is notoriously tolerant to it. By which data do you want to order? –  Michael Krelin - hacker Apr 10 '12 at 12:33
    
@MitchWheat The author of the question did not expect it, so in that sense it is unexpected. He is ordering by a hidden column, and wants to know why that order is not preserved in the final query. –  RB. Apr 10 '12 at 12:34
3  
To clarify, you were expecting 4,2,3, having selected distinct values according to the order of data? Not positive here, but I think a distinct select automatically sorts fields according to distinct fields, otherwise the query would be far less efficient. –  Neil Apr 10 '12 at 12:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You probably want to do something like

SELECT third_id
FROM first JOIN second USING (first_id)
GROUP BY third_id
ORDER BY aggregatesomething(data)

that is min(data) or max(data) or whatever.

share|improve this answer
    
Using min(data) did the work. Although, the answer of @Devart did also work, I am accepting this answer because it seems more natural and simpler solution. –  Jomoos Apr 10 '12 at 12:56
1  
Just looked it up. Guess both should work, though I'd say @Devart's is a bit fragile. Theoretically, if you have no ORDER BY your output is unordered even though this theory often differs from practice. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Apr 10 '12 at 13:22

Doing a SELECT DISTINCT requires the database to order the values in the column(s) as that is the most efficient way to find the distinct values. As far as I'm aware ORDER BY clauses that do not contain columns that are outputted in the query do not get honoured (SQL SERVER won't accept the query) as it is not clear what it would mean to order by something that did not participate.

share|improve this answer
    
I see no reason to ignore ORDER BY only because it's no selected. The problem here is ambiguity. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Apr 10 '12 at 12:37
    
In mysql, SELECT DISTINCT don't order the values, says here –  fqsxr Apr 10 '12 at 12:43
    
It is a quirk of MySQL that it allows you to write that query as it makes no sense. In the SELECT DISTINCT you completely disregard all information related to data. The query engine should tell you that you are not asking it a sensible question and bomb out. Instead, it chooses to confuse people. –  briantyler Apr 10 '12 at 12:43
    
@user317290 That page doesn't say that at all. Doing a SELECT DISTINCT doesn't explicitly sort the values (i.e. there is no guarantee that they will be sorted), but in practice it does usually sort them because that is the most efficient way to remove duplicates from a list (it might find a better way if it finds the right indexes). –  briantyler Apr 10 '12 at 12:48
    
@TheMouthofaCow It says, "A difference between DISTINCT and GROUP BY is that DISTINCT doesn't cause row sorting. In MySQL, GROUP BY does cause sorting." If you run Devart's query, it indeed get the result of "4,2,3", which means here MySQL does not use the sorting method to remove the duplicates. –  fqsxr Apr 10 '12 at 12:55

You may use a subquery -

SELECT DISTINCT third_id FROM (
  SELECT
    third_id
  FROM 
    first f JOIN second s ON ( s.first_id = f.first_id )
  ORDER BY 
    data ASC
) t;

It will help to select and sort all data firstly, then to select distinct values.

share|improve this answer

I had this exact problem before. I finally came up with a simple solution, almost seems too simple. You need to use a subquery as a column of the select query. In that subquery is where you will do the ordering by date. When you do it all in a single query with ORDER BY happens before the JOIN. You want to order first, so go with the subquery. http://nathansnoggin.blogspot.com/2009/04/select-distinct-with-order-by.html

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