Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have some doubts regarding concurrency of posix threads in multiprocessor machine. I have found similar questions in SO regarding it but didnt find conclusive answer.

Below is my understanding. I want to know if i am correct.

  1. Posix threads are user level threads and kernel is not aware of it.

  2. Kernel scheduler will treat Process( with all its threads) as one entity for scheduling. It is the thread library that in turn chooses which thread to run. It can slice the cpu time given by the kernel among the run-able threads.

  3. User threads can run on different cpu cores. ie Let threads T1 & T2 be created by a Process(T), then T1 can run in Cpu1 and T2 can run in Cpu2 BUT they cant run concurrently.

Please let me know if my understanding in correct.

Thanks...

share|improve this question
2  
All your points are incorrect, as I'm sure the other posters are saying<g> –  Martin James Apr 10 '12 at 13:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Since you marked your question with "Linux" tag I'm going to answer it according to standard pthreads implementation under linux. If you are talking about "green" threads, which are scheduled at the VM/language level instead of the OS, then your answers are mostly correct. But my comments below are on Linux pthreads.

1) Posix threads are user level threads and kernel is not aware of it.

No this is certainly not correct. The Linux kernel and the pthreads libraries work together to administer the threads. The kernel does the context switching, scheduling, memory management, cache memory management, etc.. There is other administration done at the user level of course but without he kernel, much of the power of pthreads would be lost.

2) Kernel scheduler will treat Process( with all its threads) as one entity for scheduling. It is the thread library that in turn chooses which thread to run. It can slice the cpu time given by the kernel among the run-able threads.

No, the kernel treats each process-thread as one entity. It has it's own rules about time slicing that take processes (and process priorities) into consideration but each sub-process thread is a schedulable entity.

3) User threads can run on different cpu cores. ie Let threads T1 & T2 be created by a Process(T), then T1 can run in Cpu1 and T2 can run in Cpu2 BUT they cant run concurrently.

No. Concurrent executing is expected for multi-threaded programs. That's why synchronization and mutexes are so important and why programmers put up with the complexity of multithreaded programming.


One way to prove this to you is to look at the output of ps with -L option to show the associated threads. ps usually wraps multiple threaded processes into one line but with -L you can see that the kernel has a separate virtual process-id for each thread:

ps -ef | grep 20587
foo    20587     1  1 Apr09 ?        00:16:39 java -server -Xmx1536m ...

versus

ps -eLf | grep 20587
foo    20587     1 20587  0  641 Apr09 ?    00:00:00 java -server -Xmx1536m ...
foo    20587     1 20588  0  641 Apr09 ?    00:00:30 java -server -Xmx1536m ...
foo    20587     1 20589  0  641 Apr09 ?    00:00:03 java -server -Xmx1536m ...
...

I'm not sure if Linux threads still do this but historically pthreads used the clone(2) system call to create another thread copy of itself:

Unlike fork(2), these calls allow the child process to share parts of its execution context with the calling process, such as the memory space, the table of file descriptors, and the table of signal handlers.

This is different from fork(2) which is used when another full process is created.

share|improve this answer
    
For user space threads, i read that context switch does not happen in kernel space. Is that correct? –  hackrock Apr 10 '12 at 13:30
    
There are thread implementations @rocky that do context switching in user space but not a standard pthread under Linux. Context switching can involve register dumping, stack manipulations, cache memory flushing, etc. and many of these functions cannot be accomplished in userland. –  Gray Apr 10 '12 at 13:33

POSIX does not specify how the threads created with pthread_create are scheduled on to processor cores. This is up to the implementation.

However, I would expect the following in a quality implementation, and this is the case for current versions of linux:

  • Threads are full kernel threads, and scheduled by the kernel
  • Threads from the same process can run concurrently on separate processors

i.e. all 3 of your numbered statements are wrong with current implementations of linux, but could in theory be true for another implementation that also conformed to POSIX.

share|improve this answer
    
I see no other use of having User space threads other than avoiding any over head involved in context switch. Are there any user space thread library at all Or does Posix thread library provide any mechanism to create a threads in user space by passing any attributes during thread creation? –  hackrock Apr 10 '12 at 13:41

Most POSIX implementations use OS support to provide thread functionality - they wrap the system calls needed to manage threads. As such, the behaviour of the threads re. scheduling etc depends upon the underlying OS.

So, on most modern OS:

  1. A process with POSIX threads is no different to the kernel than any other process with multiple threads.

  2. The kernel scheduler dispatches threads, not processes. A 'process' is often regarded as a higher-level construct that has code, memory-management, quotas, auditing, and security permissions, but not execution. A process can do nothing unless a thread runs its code, which is why, when a process is created, a 'main thread' is created at the same time, else nothing would run. The OS scheduling algorithm may use the process that the thread runs as one of the parameters to decide on which set of ready threads to run next - it's cheaper to swap one thread out with one from the same process - but it does not have to.

    Slicing the cpu time given by the kernel among the run-able threads is a side-effect of the OS timer interrupt when there are more ready threads than there are cores to run them. Any machine that regularly has to resort to (ugh! - I hate the term), 'time slicing' should be regarded as overloaded and should have more CPU or less work. Threads should ideally only become ready when signaled by another thread or an IO driver, not because the OS timer interrupt has decided to run it in place of another thread that could still be doing useful work.

  3. They just can run concurrently. If two threads are ready and there are two cores, the threads are dispatched onto the two cores. It does not matter if they are from the same process or not.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.