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Even after I reset the root password with the following command I can not log to MySQL: (other commands listed to provide additional info)

    # sudo dpkg-reconfigure mysql-server-5.1

    # mysql -u root -p
    Enter password:
    ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (using password: YES)

    # telnet 127.0.0.1 3306
      Trying 127.0.0.1...
      telnet: Unable to connect to remote host: Connection refused
    # ps -Aw |grep mysql
      26522 ?        00:00:00 mysqld

    # /etc/init.d/mysql start
    Rather than invoking init scripts through /etc/init.d, use the service(8)
    utility, e.g. service mysql start

    Since the script you are attempting to invoke has been converted to an
    Upstart job, you may also use the start(8) utility, e.g. start mysql

update:

     # sudo mysqladmin -u root password 123
     mysqladmin: connect to server at 'localhost' failed

it seems MySQL is not running properly

Update: I am using MySQL 5.1 under Ubuntu. It was OK until that I make some change in my.cnf to enable Remote Access. I undo my changes but problems did not solved! (Perhaps I forgot to undo some thing!)

update:

     # service mysql status
     mysql start/running, process 26650
     # /etc/init.d/mysql status
     Rather than invoking init scripts through /etc/init.d, use the service(8)
     utility, e.g. service mysql status

     Since the script you are attempting to invoke has been converted to an
     Upstart job, you may also use the status(8) utility, e.g. status mysql
     mysql start/running, process 26650
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1  
use mysqladmin command to create root password –  kappa Apr 10 '12 at 13:32
    
Sorry for the late response - if you haven't fixed the issue yet, try posting your my.cnf file (without sensitive info, of course). If you were playing around w/ remote access, it's conceivable that local access was accidentally disabled. Also consider adding logging to that my.cnf file to get a better idea of what's happening (via log-error=/var/log/mysqld.log). –  Lübnah Apr 17 '12 at 17:02
    
@Lübnah Thanks, I decided to reinstall MySQL. But how it's possible that local access became disabled? –  PHPst Apr 18 '12 at 3:10

5 Answers 5

to set root password:

 mysqladmin -u root password NEWPASSWORD

To recover it: http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/recover-mysql-root-password.html

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sudo mysqladmin -u root password 123 mysqladmin: connect to server at 'localhost' failed –  PHPst Apr 10 '12 at 13:37
    
is your mysql server up and running? try an /etc/init.d/mysqld restart and see what happens –  kappa Apr 10 '12 at 16:37
    
in your first error the server is responding, while in next blocks situation is different. Still so? –  kappa Apr 11 '12 at 7:43

My best guess is that if you have reconfigured / reinstalled MySQL, you need to login without a password, e.g.:

mysql -u root

or even

mysql


Edit: To see if the service is running, you could try:

service mysqld status

and if it is not running, try:

service mysqld start then check the status again.

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was not effective –  PHPst Apr 10 '12 at 13:38
    
Try the second part edited above, it could be that the mysql service is not running. I have encountered this problem recently. –  Jonathan Apr 10 '12 at 13:52
    
/sbin/service mysqld status -bash: /sbin/service: No such file or directory –  PHPst Apr 10 '12 at 13:59
    
Maybe it isn't under sbin on your operating system. Which operating system are you using? Using the service command alone may work (e.g. do not preceed it with the sbin). I edited my answer above. –  Jonathan Apr 10 '12 at 14:15
    
Try /etc/init.d/mysqld status… what operating system / flavor are you running, @Reza? –  Lübnah Apr 10 '12 at 14:18

It seems like MySQL is definitely not running. You can verify this with /etc/init.d/mysqld status or service mysqld status (don't link directly to the service command).

My spidey sense is telling me either your O/S or MySQL installation were performed improperly. It would help tremendously to know more about the (linux?) environment you're running, and how it was configured (or who configured it, in the case of PaaS).

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Start as a service

sudo service mysql restart

to verify & check the service and the port

sudo netstat -tap | grep mysql

Screen shot of check the mysql service running

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you should change the access permission. it should be 0644

sudo chmod 644  /etc/mysql/my.cnf

and then

sudo dpkg-reconfigure mysql-server-5.5
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