Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.
<div id="main" style="height: 100%">
    <div id="content">
    </div>
    <div id="toolbar" style="height: 50px">
    </div>
</div>

So, main div is been resized, toolbar should have fixed height and content's height should be = height of main - 50px. How is it possible to do so using styles only (without using JavaScript)?

share|improve this question
    
sure what have you tried? –  Daniel A. White Apr 10 '12 at 13:46
    
You have phrased the question in such a way that there are only two possible answers. Yes or No. –  Oded Apr 10 '12 at 13:47
    
I asked How is it possible but not Is it possible –  Sergey Metlov Apr 10 '12 at 13:48
    
He clearly asked, "How is it possible," and provided an example of what it should look like. Problem? –  developdaly Apr 10 '12 at 14:40
    
@DotNETNinja I'm not sure if you've noticed, but I've posted an answer. If it's not what you're looking for, could you please update your question? –  ShadowScripter Apr 11 '12 at 19:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

What a mess, huh? Don't worry about it, your question was and still is valid. Let's just focus on answering the question.

I took the liberty of making three examples1:

Let's see if I can explain them properly.

1 Sadly, I couldn't make them resizable according to the new CSS3 property resize.


The explanation

So, I used an old technique where you basically use a wrapper with 100% height, then give it a negative margin and a positive padding corresponding to the constant height value. The combination of a negative margin and a positive padding will result in an empty space with the same height as the content with a fixed height.

.container{
    height: 400px;
}

.wrapper{
    height: 100%;
    margin-top: -50px;
    padding-top: 50px;
}

.content{
    height: 100%;
}

.fixed_content{
    height: 50px;
}

Technically, the fixed content is being "pushed out" from the wrapper, but since the wrapper has a negative margin that adjusts for that element, it looks like normal flow.

To better demonstrate, I drew this picture.

demonstration

It should be noted that you can do the same thing horizontally as well, with some minor adjustments.

.container{
    width: 400px;
    height: 400px;
}

.wrapper{
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
    padding-left: 50px;
    margin-left: -50px;
    white-space:nowrap;
}

.content{
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
    display: inline-block;
}

.fixed_content{
    height: 100%;
    width: 50px;
    display: inline-block;
}

In principle, it works the same way. The main difference is that you have to "force" the inline elements to stay on the same line, so that the overflow is instead horizontally aligned. I do that by using white-space: no-wrap; and display: inline-block;

Here is a picture I drew that demonstrate the horizontal equivalent. demonstration2

The possibilities are endless! You can add more elements to it, as long as you know the sum of all the fixed elements height/widths.

Table layouts are for wimps. All the cool programmers use divs. ;)


First example | Code

HTML

<div class='container'>
    <div class='node_1'>
        <div class='wrapper'>
            <div class='node_1_1'>
                <div class='wrapper_2'>
                    <div class='node_1_1_1'></div>
                    <div class='node_1_1_2'></div>
                </div>
            </div>
            <div class='node_1_2'></div>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

CSS

div{
   -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
    box-sizing: border-box;
    padding: 2px;
}

.container{
    border: 2px solid red;
    width: 400px;
    height: 400px;
    margin: 0 auto;
}

.node_1{
    border: 2px solid gray;
    height: 100%;
}

.wrapper{
    padding: 52px 0 0 0;
    margin-top: -52px;
    height: 100%;
}

.node_1_1{
    border: 2px solid purple;
    height: 100%;
}

.node_1_2{
    height: 50px;
    border: 2px solid #b80808;
    margin-top: 2px;
}

.wrapper_2{
    padding: 152px 0 0 0;
    margin-top: -152px;
    height: 100%;
}

.node_1_1_1{
    border: 2px solid green;
    height: 150px;
}

.node_1_1_2{
    border: 2px solid orange;
    height: 100%;
    margin-top: 2px;
}

Second example | Code

HTML

<div class='container'>
    <div class='wrapper'>
        <div id="content"></div>
        <div id="toolbar"></div>
    </div>
</div>

CSS

div{
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
    box-sizing: border-box;
    padding: 2px;
}

.container{
    border: 2px solid red;
    width: 400px;
    height: 400px;
    margin: 0 auto;
}

.wrapper{
    height: 100%;
    padding: 52px 0 0 0;
    margin-top: -52px;
}

#content{
    height: 100%;
    border: 2px solid green;
}

#toolbar{
    height: 50px;
    border: 2px solid orange;
    margin-top: 2px;
}

Third example | Code

HTML

<div class='container'>
    <div class='wrapper'>
        <div id="content"></div>
        <div id="vert-toolbar"></div>
    </div>
</div>

CSS

div{
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
    box-sizing: border-box;
    padding: 2px;
}

.container{
    border: 2px solid red;
    width: 400px;
    height: 400px;
    margin: 0 auto;
}

.wrapper{
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
    padding: 0 52px 0 0;
    margin: 0 -52px 0 0;
    white-space:nowrap; /*Force elements to stay on horizontal plane*/
}

#content{
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
    border: 2px solid green;
    display: inline-block;
}

#vert-toolbar{
    height: 100%;
    width: 50px;
    border: 2px solid blue;
    display: inline-block;
    margin-left: -2px; /*For the borders (2+2 = 4, -2 for a 2px "padding"*/

}
share|improve this answer
1  
Great answer!!! –  rickyduck Apr 11 '12 at 8:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.