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gcc (GCC) 4.6.3 c89 valgrind-3.6.1

Hello,

Updated code snippet +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

void *thread_recv_fd()
{
    pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex_queue);
    while(start_receiving) {
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex_queue);

        pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex_queue);
        queue_remove();
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex_queue);

        usleep(500);
    }

    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

using the above locks looks very ugly now. And I am still getting a race error on the reading of the start_receiving. I have also declared it as volatile as well. +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I am running a while loop in a worker thread that polls every 1/2 second. I control it with a global variable start_receiving after the user enters ctrl-c it will change the value to false.

Having a global like this is it good practice?

The reason I asked as I get these 2 errors when I run helgrind:

==6814== Possible data race during write of size 4 at 0x601958 by thread #1
==6814==    at 0x401131: main (driver.c:78) 
==6814==  This conflicts with a previous read of size 4 by thread #2
==6814==    at 0x4012A7: thread_recv_fd (driver.c:127)

This are the lines of code:

driver.c:78 is this line of code start_receiving = FALSE;
driver.c:127 is this line of code while(start_receiving) in the while loop

Source code, just the important snippets:

static int start_receiving = FALSE;

int main(void)
{
    pthread_t thread_recv_id;
    pthread_attr_t thread_attr;

    /* Start polling as soon as thread has been created */
    start_receiving = TRUE;

    do {
        /* Start thread that will send a message */
        if(pthread_create(&thread_recv_id, &thread_attr, thread_recv_fd, NULL) == -1) {
            fprintf(stderr, "Failed to create thread, reason [ %s ]",
                    strerror(errno));
            break;
        }
    }
    while(0);

    /* Wait for ctrl-c */
    pause(); 

    /* Stop polling - exit while loop */
    start_receiving = FALSE;

    /* Clean up threading properties */
    pthread_join(thread_recv_id, NULL);

    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

void *thread_recv_fd()
{
    while(start_receiving) {
        pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex_queue);
        queue_remove();
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex_queue);

        usleep(500);
    }

    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

Many thanks for any suggestions,

share|improve this question
    
at the very least, you should make start_receiving volatile so the compile knows not to cache the reads of that variable. –  Evan Teran Apr 10 '12 at 14:58
    
if you using a 64 bit "int" on a 32 bit processor then change of a int value is not an atomic action and that's maybe way you see the "race condition" error. just try to change start_receiving to bool –  Roee Gavirel Apr 10 '12 at 15:00
add comment

3 Answers

No, it's very bad practice.

At the very least, the variable should be volatile to avoid being optimized out.

You should really look into using some real multi-thread primitives for this though, such as mutexes (to protect the shared state, so that the two threads aren't accessing it at the same time) and atomic variables (to make sure the state is thread-proof).

share|improve this answer
    
For this simple example, a single global variable is absolutely fine, since one thread only writes it and the other only reads it. It's true that it needs to be volatile beause the compiler will otherwise load it into a register at the top of the loop and never look at it again. And he probably needs a memory barrier to make sure the variable isn't just read from the CPU cache (on a multicore system). –  JeremyP Apr 10 '12 at 15:22
    
Yes, you are correct. Using the keyword volatile prevents the compiler doing any optimization on the object. However, having ran under helgrind again. I am still getting the race condition. I was thinking of using the mutex. But I was thinking it was over kill for just one variable. –  ant2009 Apr 10 '12 at 16:21
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Polling isn't a right way. I suggest you to read about conditional variables

share|improve this answer
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You could use atomics, but the simplest solution here is just to use locking around the controlling variable. For example:

static int start_receiving = FALSE;
static pthread_mutex_t start_receiving_lock = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;

int is_receiving(void)
{
    int r;

    pthread_mutex_lock(&start_receiving_lock);
    r = start_receiving;
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&start_receiving_lock);

    return r;
}

Then in the thread function:

void *thread_recv_fd()
{
    while(is_receiving()) {
        pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex_queue);
        queue_remove();
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex_queue);

        usleep(500);
    }

    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

..and in the main function:

pthread_mutex_lock(&start_receiving_lock);
start_receiving = 1;
pthread_mutex_unlock(&start_receiving_lock);
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the code snippet. However, i am still getting the same race conditions when I run under helgrind or drd. I have declared start_receiving at volatile and sig_atomic_t i.e. static volatile sig_atomic_t start_receiving; Would using atomics fix these errors? Thanks. –  ant2009 Apr 12 '12 at 5:57
    
@ant2009: volatile is neither necessary nor sufficient. Just make it a plain int, but make sure it is only ever read or written with the mutex held. –  caf Apr 12 '12 at 9:56
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