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I am tyring to load objects from a SQL server (I am shying away from an orm framework for performance reasons)

My thought was to have a factory class that retreived records from the server and created the appropriate type of objects.

All objects will inherit from an abstract class: aDefinition. Although the concrete objects that derive from aDefintion both share some similar properties, they also have unique properties of their own on top of the base class.

As I am fairly new to programming, I just wanted to get a feel for if I am on the right track.

I couple of questions:

  • Does it make sense to use an abstract class in this case?

  • Would it be a good idea to store the collection of definitions in the DefinitionCreator class as a List<aDefinition> and provide it methods for accessing the objects or would it be a better idea to create different concrete collections for the different object types?

public class DefinitionTemplate
{
    public int DefinitionId { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public DefintionType DefinitionType { get; set; }
    public string Definition { get; set; }
    public string Parameters { get; set; }

    public DefinitionTemplate()
    {
    }
}

//abstract base class that my concrete classes will inherit from.
public abstract class aDefinition
{
    public int DefinitionId { get; protected set; }
    public string Name { get; protected set; }
    public DefintionType DefinitionType { get; protected set; }

    //abstract methods
    public abstract bool LoadDefinition(DefinitionTemplate template);
    public abstract bool SaveDefinition();
}

//concrete class representing a report-type definition.
public class ReportDefinition : aDefinition
{
    public string Definition { get; private set; }
    public string Parameters { get; private set; }

    public override bool LoadDefinition(DefinitionTemplate template)
    {
        this.DefinitionId = template.DefinitionId;
        this.Name = template.Name;
        this.DefinitionType = template.DefinitionType;
        this.Definition = template.Definition;
        this.Parameters = template.Parameters;
        return true;
    }

    public override bool SaveDefinition()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

//concrete class representing a configuration-type definition.
public class ConfigDefinition : aDefinition
{
    public string Parameters { get; private set; }

    public override bool LoadDefinition(DefinitionTemplate template)
    {
        this.DefinitionId = template.DefinitionId;
        this.Name = template.Name;
        this.DefinitionType = template.DefinitionType;
        this.Parameters = template.Parameters;
        return true;
    }

    public override bool SaveDefinition()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

//creator class that retreives the definitions from the server and creates the approprite object
public static class DefinitionCreator
{
    public void RetreiveDefinitions()
    {
        //sql statment to retreive definitions
        using(SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("select * from definitions", new SqlConnection()))
        {
            using(SqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader())
            {
                while (reader.Read())
                {
                    switch (reader["DefinitionType"].ToString())
                    {
                        case "ReportDefinition":
                            //create a report definition object
                            break;
                        case "ConfigDefinition":
                            //create a config definition object
                            break;
                    }
                }
            }
        } 
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
I know you're shying away from using ORMs, but if you have access to EF. You may want to generate from DB and see how it generates its classes. This may give you an idea of how you may want to do this yourself, manually. –  Khan Apr 10 '12 at 15:08
4  
"I am shying away from an orm framework for performance reasons" >> why? Most ORM solutions, like NHibernate and others, largely outperform direct access or home-grown solutions because they support heavy object caching or all sorts, limiting the amount of SQL statements required, and can apply SQL optimizations. In addition, they only get the fields required, and only when required (lazy loading). –  Abel Apr 10 '12 at 15:08
1  
I am also wary of the learning-curve for some of these frameworks as well as the application startup time required for loading the additional DLL's required for an ORM. –  ChandlerPelhams Apr 10 '12 at 15:13
5  
"I am shying away from an orm framework for performance reasons": You don't really have a performance problem until you've measured it. –  Bryan Crosby Apr 10 '12 at 15:23
3  
You might consider a "micro-ORM" like [Dapper][1] or [Massive][2] [1]: github.com/SamSaffron/dapper-dot-net [2]: github.com/robconery/massive They are generally quite simple, and high-performing (at least from a pure object-hydration standpoint) –  jlew Apr 10 '12 at 15:40

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