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I have this script, works ok:

#!/usr/bin/perl

$key = pack("H*","3cb37efae7f4f376ebbd76cd");

$str = "&4\=80CHB'";
$dec = decode($str);
print "Decoded string value: $dec\n";

sub decode{ #Sub to decode
    @subvar=@_;
    my $sqlstr = $subvar[0];
    $cipher = unpack("u", $sqlstr);
    $plain = $cipher^$key;
    return substr($plain, 0, length($cipher));
}

If I alter it to get the $str variable from STDIN, it messes up all the result:

#!/usr/bin/perl

$key = pack("H*","3cb37efae7f4f376ebbd76cd");

print "Enter string to decode: ";
$str=<STDIN>;chomp $str;
$dec = decode($str);
print "Decoded string value: $dec\n";

sub decode{ #Sub to decode
    @subvar=@_;
    my $sqlstr = $subvar[0];
    $cipher = unpack("u", $sqlstr);
    $plain = $cipher^$key;
    return substr($plain, 0, length($cipher));
}

First script gets it ok, result is:

Decoded string value: mentos

Second script is bad:

Decoded string value: ot&¸ÝÖóvë½vÍ

Any idea on what I do wrong? Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You original code has

$str = "&4\=80CHB'";

which for some reason contains an escaped equals sign. It is the same as

$str = "&4=80CHB'";

so you need to enter &4=80CHB' to your modified code.

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My sting needs to have "\" and other special characters, how can I escape them to keep them unaltered as I send them from STDIN? Something with \Q....\E ??? –  xtmtrx Apr 10 '12 at 15:25
1  
@xtmtrx, Your string does not contain "\". The string literal "&4\=80CHB'" produces the string &4=80CHB'. If you want the string &4\=80CHB', you need to use the literal "&4\\=80CHB'". –  ikegami Apr 10 '12 at 15:33
    
You can use single quotes (or the q operator) like 'ABC\123' which represents the characters ABC\123. Your string above could be coded as q(&4\=80CHB'). You can use any printable character as the delimiters for q, but if the last character is a backslash you always have to double it up, like q|ABC\123\\| for ABC\123\. –  Borodin Apr 10 '12 at 16:27
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