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I am trying to "extend" a DIV via Javascript by using a newly created div as prototype of my object.

As I understand Javascript, on creating a new instance of my Object via "new", the prototype-object is copied, assigned to "this" an then the function is executed (as the constructor).

Everything seems to work, except that whenever I create another object, and add it to the DOM, it "replaces" the original div. To be more exact: The constructor always changes the same div.

Using MyTest.prototype = document.createElement("div"); gives me the described behavior, the two commented lines after that in my code example are what I also tried, but to no avail.

I know trying to extend the DOM is frowned upon, but I want to understand this behavior, because I thought I knew how prototypes work and this simply does not fit my idea.

Here is a minimal example of what I am trying to do:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<title>Div-Prototype-Test</title>
<script type="text/javascript">

var height = 20;
var top = 0;

function MyTest() {
    var r = Math.floor(Math.random() * 256);
    var g = Math.floor(Math.random() * 256);
    var b = Math.floor(Math.random() * 256);

    this.style.backgroundColor = "rgb("+ r +","+ g +","+ b +")";
    this.style.position        = "absolute";
    this.style.width           = "500px";
    this.style.height          = height + "px";
    this.style.top             = top + "px";

    top += height;

    document.getElementsByTagName("body")[0].appendChild(this);
}

MyTest.prototype = document.createElement("div");
// MyTest.prototype = document.createElement("div").cloneNode(true);
// MyTest.prototype = new Element();

window.addEventListener(
    "load", 
    function() {
        var a = new MyTest();
        var b = new MyTest();
        var c = new MyTest();
        var d = new MyTest();
    }
);

</script>
</head>
<body>
</body>
</html>

PS: Because of a certain Javascript-Framework my search for anything that changes the prototype in Javascript always resulted in hundreds of results that had nothing to do with my problem - please tell me if I missed a question that already discusses this.

Edit:

To make my question clearer:

Here is an example where I use an object as prototype - its properties get copied.

function A() {
}

A.prototype = { property: 4 };

A.prototype.set = function(num) {
    this.property = num;
}

window.addEventListener(
    "load", 
    function() {
        var message = "";

        var x1 = new A();
        message += "A1 : "+ x1.property +"\n";

        x1.set(15);
        message += "A1 : "+ x1.property +"\n";

        var x2 = new A();
        message += "A2 : "+ x2.property +"\n";

        alert(message);
    }
);

The alert then said:

A1 : 4
A1 : 15
A2 : 4

The Div in my first example however does not seem to be copied, it behaves like a Singleton or Monostate. Should it not go like this?

  1. Protype object is copied into a new object
  2. the new object is assigned to "this"
  3. this is given to the constructor
  4. this is returned by the constructor (if no return statement is specified)
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

MyTest.prototype = document.createElement("div");

This line is executed only once. It creates a MyTest.prototype object which is also a DOM element <div>. Every MyTest object will receive this same prototype. Therefore, every MyTest object you create will be associated with this single <div> you created only once. You will have to create a new <div> for every MyTest.

Try this pattern:

MyTest = function() {
    var myDiv = document.createElement("div");

    var r = Math.floor(Math.random() * 256);
    var g = Math.floor(Math.random() * 256);
    var b = Math.floor(Math.random() * 256);

    myDiv.style.backgroundColor = "rgb("+ r +","+ g +","+ b +")";
    myDiv.style.position        = "absolute";
    myDiv.style.width           = "500px";
    myDiv.style.height          = height + "px";
    myDiv.style.top             = top + "px";

    top += height;

    document.getElementsByTagName("body")[0].appendChild(myDiv);

    return myDiv;
}

This function creates a new <div>, using the createElement() call. Then, it sets all the properties you want on that new <div>. Finally, it returns your new <div>. As such, you can call it as

var myNewDiv = MyTest();
var myNewDiv = new MyTest();

Both options would work. In the second case a dummy new object is created by the new keyword, but it doesn't matter, as the new <div> created inside the function is actually returned.

share|improve this answer
    
And that is what I do not understand: When I use a different Object as a prototype, it and its properties are copied. When I change one of that properties, it does not change the properties of the original prototype, right? –  sirion Apr 10 '12 at 15:42
1  
They are not copied. If there is a property, for example, x in MyTest.prototype and you have var test = new MyTest(); test.x = 'abc'; then you actually add a new x property to the test object and you hide the x property in the prototype. However, in your code, you do not add a new property to every object. All instances refer to the style property, which is still in prototype and belongs to the one single div you created. –  Imp Apr 10 '12 at 15:49
    
But why does this principle not apply with my second example? (Which I added after you wrote your answer) –  sirion Apr 10 '12 at 15:53
    
have done plus 1 to the question and answer - prototypes are very confusing at times .... –  Symeon Apr 10 '12 at 15:55
    
@sirion Because when you called x1.set(15);, it executed the code inside the set() function: this.property = num; with x1 as this and 15 as num, so it did x1.property = 15;. This created a new property named property inside the object x1. So what happens is: x1.property is found inside the object x1 with value 15. x2.property is not found inside the object x2, so the lookup continues into the prototype. There, it is found with the value 4. –  Imp Apr 10 '12 at 16:01

You are mixing all kind of things. First, check my answer to this SO question. Second, Extending the Element Object can be done, but is is not supported by all browsers. Check this SO question.

Seems to me that you are planning to add elements to the document in some standardized way. Your code could be rewritten to (I modified it a bit):

function appendElement(content,id) {
    var rgb = 'rgb('+ [Math.floor(Math.random() * 256),
               Math.floor(Math.random() * 256),
               Math.floor(Math.random() * 256)].join(',') +')';
    var top  = Math.floor( Math.random() * 300 + 20 );
    var left = Math.floor( Math.random() * 100 + 10 );

    this.style.backgroundColor = rgb;
    this.style.position        = "absolute";
    this.style.width           = "500px";
    this.style.height          = "200px";
    this.style.left            = left+"px";
    this.style.top             = top+"px";
    this.innerHTML             = content || '';
    this.id                    = id || Math.Random*10000+1
    document.getElementsByTagName("body")[0].appendChild(this);
}

Now you can use this to append any element to the document using `appendElement as follows:

appendElement.call(document.createElement('div'),'empty div');
appendElement.call(document.createElement('span'),'new empty span','span1');

Would that be an idea for what you aim at?

share|improve this answer
    
Actually my original Idea was to add Elements to the DOM that have additional functionality (I now just want to understand why it does not work). Like xxx.appendChild(new FadeDiv(urlList)); with urlList being an array of image urls. This should then load the images in the background and fade from one to the other. The idea was that it should be usable like any other div. –  sirion Apr 11 '12 at 7:31
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I found a workaround, it basically works the other way round - the prototype is a blank object and I copy the new objects data into a div in the constructor:

var height = 20;
var top = 0;

function deepCopy(fromObject, toObject, depth) {
    if(typeof(fromObject) != "object" || typeof(toObject) != "object") {
        // throw "deepCopy only copies objects"
        return;
    }

    if (typeof(depth) == "undefined") {
        depth = 0;
    } else if (depth > 100) {
        // Recursion depth too high. Abort.
        // throw "deepCopy recursion depth cap hit"
        return;
    }

    for (var key in fromObject) {
        if (typeof(fromObject[key]) == "object" && fromObject[key] != null) {
            if (typeof(fromObject[key].nodeType) != "undefined") {
                toObject[key] = fromObject[key].cloneNode(true);
            } else {
                if (typeof(toObject[key]) != "object") {
                    toObject[key] = {};
                }
                deepCopy(fromObject[key], toObject[key], depth + 1);
            }           

        }
        toObject[key] = fromObject[key];
    }
}    

function MyTest() {
    // This is ugly...
    var self = document.createElement("div");
    deepCopy(MyTest.prototype, self);

    var r = Math.floor(Math.random() * 256);
    var g = Math.floor(Math.random() * 256);
    var b = Math.floor(Math.random() * 256);

    self.style.backgroundColor = "rgb("+ r +","+ g +","+ b +")";
    self.style.position        = "absolute";
    self.style.width           = "500px";
    self.style.height          = height + "px";
    self.style.top             = top + "px";

    top += height;

    document.getElementsByTagName("body")[0].appendChild(self);

    return self;
}

MyTest.prototype = {};
// MyTest.prototype = document.createElement("div").cloneNode(true);
// MyTest.prototype = new Element();

window.addEventListener(
    "load", 
    function() {
        var a = new MyTest();
        var b = new MyTest();
        var c = new MyTest();
        var d = new MyTest();
    }
);

Although I have the feeling that my deepCopy-function is a rather inelegant (and possibly very buggy) way to perform the task, but the other way round with using cloneNode() did not work.

My original problem came from this: When the prototype is copied, all scalar values are copied, while all objects are simply referenced (like copying pointers, the pointer value is duplicated, but not the data it points to).

Hope this helps someone.

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