Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a relatively simple algorithm that walks an std::vector looking for two neighbouring tuples. Once the tuples left and right of the X value are found I can interpolate between them. Somehow this works:

  std::vector<LutTuple*>::iterator tuple_it;
  LutTuple* left = NULL;
  LutTuple* right = NULL;
  bool found = 0;

  // Only iterate as long as the points are not found
  for(tuple_it = lut.begin(); (tuple_it != lut.end() && !found); tuple_it++) {
    // If the tuple is less than r2 we found the first element
    if((*tuple_it)->r < r) {
        left = *tuple_it;
    }
    if ((*tuple_it)->r > r) {
        right = *tuple_it;
    }
    if(left && right) {
        found = 1;
    }
  }

while this:

  std::vector<LutTuple*>::iterator tuple_it;
  LutTuple* left = NULL;
  LutTuple* right = NULL;

  // Only iterate as long as the points are not found
  for(tuple_it = lut.begin(); tuple_it != lut.end() && !left && !right; tuple_it++) {
    // If the tuple is less than r2 we found the first element
    if((*tuple_it)->r < r) {
        left = *tuple_it;
    }
    if ((*tuple_it)->r > r) {
        right = *tuple_it;
    }
  }

does not. Why is that? I'd expect two NULL ptrs like this to evaluate to true together when negated.

share|improve this question
6  

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is a logical issue.

In the first snippet you have (essentially) !(left && right).

In the second snippet you have: !left && !right.

Those are not equivalent.

If you build the truth table, you will realize that !(left && right) is equivalent to (!left || !right).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this clears it up for me! –  Julik Apr 11 '12 at 13:53

The second loop will terminate as soon as either is found. Change the condition to:

tuple_it != lut.end() && !(left && right)

or

tuple_it != lut.end() && (!left || !right)

to continue until both are found.

share|improve this answer

I'd expect two NULL ptrs like this to evaluate to true together when negated.

This does not make sense. Do not "negate" pointers and expect what they will evaluate to when forced into a boolean expression. Instead, I recommend to explicitly compare them to NULL.

Also, move your complex boolean expression for continuing the loop into a separate line, otherwise it becomes very hard to follow the code logically.

share|improve this answer
2  
The standard conversion from pointer to boolean is well defined. The choice of whether to use that or an explicit comparison is purely aesthetic. –  Mike Seymour Apr 10 '12 at 15:23
    
@Mike, my answer addresses readability, not correctness. I am sure that the code behaves "correctly" as it is written - it is just that it does not do what the author expects, so the problem is largely about making it more readable and less error-prone. –  Daniel Daranas Apr 10 '12 at 15:24
1  
One could just as easily argue that the standard conversion is more readable and less error-prone; the choice is purely aesthetic, and your personal preference is irrelevant to this question. –  Mike Seymour Apr 10 '12 at 15:27
    
I generally agree that "null is false" is sort of lame. But it is the convention, and especially with shared pointers the operator overload keeps the code brief: hostilefork.com/2009/10/26/treating-non-booleans-as-logic –  HostileFork Apr 10 '12 at 15:41
1  
@MikeSeymour It's not purely aesthetic. The conversion confuses a lot of people. Myself included, but judging from the number of errors I see with regards to things like using the return value of stdchr, apparently I'm not alone. –  James Kanze Apr 10 '12 at 16:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.