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I have this string s1 = "My name is X Y Z" and I want to reverse the order of the words so that s1 = "Z Y X is name My".

I can do it using an additional array. I thought hard but is it possible to do it inplace (without using additional data structures) and with the time complexity being O(n)?

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3  
dupe: stackoverflow.com/questions/47402/… –  Miles Jun 17 '09 at 20:08
10  
string.split(' ').reverse().join(' ') –  zzzzBov Feb 8 '12 at 16:43
1  
^uses extra memory –  KodeSeeker Feb 10 '13 at 21:21

34 Answers 34

up vote 77 down vote accepted

Reverse the entire string, then reverse the letters of each individual word.

After the first pass the string will be

s1 = "Z Y X si eman yM"

and after the second pass it will be

s1 = "Z Y X is name My"
share|improve this answer
2  
"name", for example, is not reversed in his example. –  Sev Jun 17 '09 at 19:50
10  
That's why you do the second pass to reverse the letters of each word. –  Bill the Lizard Jun 17 '09 at 19:51
1  
It works, but isn't it the order of complexity greater than O(n) then?! –  Mike Dinescu Jun 17 '09 at 19:56
23  
@Miky, no, it's O(n). Reversing the entire string is easily done in O(n), and reversing each word in a string is also easy to do in O(n). O(n)+O(n) = O(n). –  Triptych Jun 17 '09 at 20:02
1  
keep in mind that for any practical applications involving internationalization, reversing a string turns out to be a nightmare and not just reversing an array of chars –  Grozz Jul 20 '12 at 23:40

reverse the string and then, in a second pass, reverse each word...

in c#, completely in-place without additional arrays:

static char[] ReverseAllWords(char[] in_text)
{
    int lindex = 0;
    int rindex = in_text.Length - 1;
    if (rindex > 1)
    {
        //reverse complete phrase
        in_text = ReverseString(in_text, 0, rindex);

        //reverse each word in resultant reversed phrase
        for (rindex = 0; rindex <= in_text.Length; rindex++)
        {
            if (rindex == in_text.Length || in_text[rindex] == ' ')
            {
                in_text = ReverseString(in_text, lindex, rindex - 1);
                lindex = rindex + 1;
            }
        }
    }
    return in_text;
}

static char[] ReverseString(char[] intext, int lindex, int rindex)
{
    char tempc;
    while (lindex < rindex)
    {
        tempc = intext[lindex];
        intext[lindex++] = intext[rindex];
        intext[rindex--] = tempc;
    }
    return intext;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Do you think it's a O(n) operation? When we are calling ReverseString inside that for loop I think it don't happen within O(n) time. –  Pritam Karmakar May 5 '11 at 7:18
2  
@Pritam: ReverseString is not run in the for loop every time. There is one full reverse pass on the string (first pass), then the for loop finds the spaces which demarcate word boundaries (another pass). The ReverseString called within (and, importantly, not at every index) is O(m), where m is the length of the word. It is called for every word. The sum of all O(m) word-length operations is equivalent to O(n). Thus, this algorithm is worst case 3 * O(n), which is still O(n). If ReverseString were called at every index I think that you would be correct... –  Demi Aug 24 '11 at 18:34
Not exactly in place, but anyway: Python:

>>> a = "These pretzels are making me thirsty"
>>> " ".join(a.split()[::-1])
'thirsty me making are pretzels These'
share|improve this answer
1  
This version will replace multiple spaces, tabs, and newlines with single spaces. –  Triptych Jun 17 '09 at 20:06
8  
No @Shadow, It's not really a good answer. The question was about an algorithm to solve the problem (with attention to data structures utilized and order of complexity) and not an implementation in a high level language. (And neither was yours - albeit both were "correct") –  Mike Dinescu Jun 17 '09 at 20:09

In Smalltalk:

'These pretzels are making me thirsty' subStrings reduce: [:a :b| b, ' ', a]

I know noone cares about Smalltalk, but it's so beautiful to me.

share|improve this answer

You cannot do the reversal without at least some extra data structure. I think the smallest structure would be a single character as a buffer while you swap letters. It can still be considered "in place", but it's not completely "extra data structure free".

Below is code implementing what Bill the Lizard describes:

string words = "this is a test";

// Reverse the entire string
for(int i = 0; i < strlen(words) / 2; ++i) {
  char temp = words[i];
  words[i] = words[strlen(words) - i];
  words[strlen(words) - i] = temp;
}

// Reverse each word
for(int i = 0; i < strlen(words); ++i) {
  int wordstart = -1;
  int wordend = -1;
  if(words[i] != ' ') {
    wordstart = i;
    for(int j = wordstart; j < strlen(words); ++j) {
      if(words[j] == ' ') {
        wordend = j - 1;
        break;
      }
    }
    if(wordend == -1)
      wordend = strlen(words);
    for(int j = wordstart ; j <= (wordend - wordstart) / 2 ; ++j) {
      char temp = words[j];
      words[j] = words[wordend - (j - wordstart)];
      words[wordend - (j - wordstart)] = temp;
    }
    i = wordend;
  }
}
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4  
You can do it without an extra character if you use some bitwise or arithmetic trickery. For example: a ^= b; b ^= a; a ^= b; will swap a and b. –  Niki Yoshiuchi Jun 17 '09 at 21:52

What language? If PHP, you can explode on space, then pass the result to array_reverse.

If its not PHP, you'll have to do something slightly more complex like:

words = aString.split(" ");
for (i = 0; i < words.length; i++) {
    words[i] = words[words.length-i];
}
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1  
I don't think this would work because for i > words.length / 2, the words will be copied back. E.g. "this is a test" becomes "test a a test". Also when i is 0 then words[words.length-i] will cause an exception (out-of-bounds). –  Chaos Apr 22 '12 at 7:12
public static String ReverseString(String str)
{
    int word_length = 0;
    String result = "";
    for (int i=0; i<str.Length; i++)
    {
        if (str[i] == ' ')
        {
            result = " " + result;
            word_length = 0;
        } else 
        {
            result = result.Insert(word_length, str[i].ToString());
            word_length++;
        }
    }
    return result;
}

This is C# code.

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In Python...

ip = "My name is X Y Z"
words = ip.split()
words.reverse()
print ' '.join(words)

Anyway cookamunga provided good inline solution using python!

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This is not perfect but it works for me right now. I don't know if it has O(n) running time btw (still studying it ^^) but it uses one additional array to fulfill the task.

It is probably not the best answer to your problem because i use a dest string to save the reversed version instead of replacing each words in the source string. The problem is that i use a local stack variable named buf to copy all the words in and i can not copy but into the source string as this would lead to a crash if the source string is const char * type.

But it was my first attempt to write s.th. like this :) Ok enough blablub. here is code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void reverse(char *des, char * const s);
int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{    
    char* s = (char*)"reservered. rights All Saints. The 2011 (c) Copyright 11/10/11 on Pfundstein Markus by Created";
    char *x = (char*)"Dogfish! White-spotted Shark, Bullhead";

    printf("Before: |%s|\n", x);
    printf("Before: |%s|\n", s);

    char *d = (char*)malloc((strlen(s)+1)*sizeof(char));  
    char *i = (char*)malloc((strlen(x)+1)*sizeof(char));

    reverse(d,s);
    reverse(i,x);

    printf("After: |%s|\n", i);
    printf("After: |%s|\n", d);

    free (i);
    free (d);

    return 0;
}

void reverse(char *dest, char *const s) {
    // create a temporary pointer
    if (strlen(s)==0) return;
    unsigned long offset = strlen(s)+1;

    char *buf = (char*)malloc((offset)*sizeof(char));
    memset(buf, 0, offset);

    char *p;
    // iterate from end to begin and count how much words we have
    for (unsigned long i = offset; i != 0; i--) {
        p = s+i;
        // if we discover a whitespace we know that we have a whole word
        if (*p == ' ' || *p == '\0') {
            // we increment the counter
            if (*p != '\0') {
                // we write the word into the buffer
                ++p;
                int d = (int)(strlen(p)-strlen(buf));
                strncat(buf, p, d);
                strcat(buf, " ");
            }
        }
    }

    // copy the last word
    p -= 1;
    int d = (int)(strlen(p)-strlen(buf));
    strncat(buf, p, d);
    strcat(buf, "\0");

    // copy stuff to destination string
    for (int i = 0; i < offset; ++i) {
        *(dest+i)=*(buf+i);
    }

    free(buf);
}
share|improve this answer

We can insert the string in a stack and when we extract the words, they will be in reverse order.

void ReverseWords(char Arr[])
{
    std::stack<std::string> s;
    char *str;
    int length = strlen(Arr);
    str = new char[length+1];
    std::string ReversedArr;
    str = strtok(Arr," ");
    while(str!= NULL)
    {
        s.push(str);
        str = strtok(NULL," ");
    }
    while(!s.empty())
    {
        ReversedArr = s.top();
        cout << " " << ReversedArr;
        s.pop();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

This quick program works..not checks the corner cases though.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
struct node
{
    char word[50];
    struct node *next;
};
struct stack
{
    struct node *top;
};
void print (struct stack *stk);
void func (struct stack **stk, char *str);
main()
{
    struct stack *stk = NULL;
    char string[500] = "the sun is yellow and the sky is blue";
    printf("\n%s\n", string);
    func (&stk, string);
    print (stk);
}
void func (struct stack **stk, char *str)
{
    char *p1 = str;
    struct node *new = NULL, *list = NULL;
    int i, j;
    if (*stk == NULL)
    {
        *stk = (struct stack*)malloc(sizeof(struct stack));
        if (*stk == NULL)
            printf("\n####### stack is not allocated #####\n");
        (*stk)->top = NULL;
    }
    i = 0;
    while (*(p1+i) != '\0')
    {
        if (*(p1+i) != ' ')
        {
            new = (struct node*)malloc(sizeof(struct node));
            if (new == NULL)
                printf("\n####### new is not allocated #####\n");
            j = 0;
            while (*(p1+i) != ' ' && *(p1+i) != '\0')
            {
                new->word[j] = *(p1 + i);
                i++;
                j++;
            }
            new->word[j++] = ' ';
            new->word[j] = '\0';
            new->next = (*stk)->top;
            (*stk)->top = new;
        }
        i++;
   }
}
void print (struct stack *stk)
{
    struct node *tmp = stk->top;
    int i;
    while (tmp != NULL)
    {
        i = 0;
        while (tmp->word[i] != '\0')
        {
            printf ("%c" , tmp->word[i]);
            i++;
        }
        tmp = tmp->next;
    }
    printf("\n");
}
share|improve this answer

This is assuming all words are separated by spaces:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
    char string[] = "What are you looking at";
    int i, n = strlen(string);

    int tail = n-1;
    for(i=n-1;i>=0;i--)
    {
        if(string[i] == ' ' || i == 0)
        {
            int cursor = (i==0? i: i+1);
            while(cursor <= tail)
                printf("%c", string[cursor++]);
            printf(" ");
            tail = i-1;
        }
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

My version of using stack:

public class Solution {
    public String reverseWords(String s) {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        String ns= s.trim();
        Stack<Character> reverse = new Stack<Character>();
        boolean hadspace=false;

        //first pass
        for (int i=0; i< ns.length();i++){
            char c = ns.charAt(i);
            if (c==' '){
                if (!hadspace){
                    reverse.push(c);
                    hadspace=true;
                }
            }else{
                hadspace=false;
                reverse.push(c);
            }
        }
        Stack<Character> t = new Stack<Character>();
        while (!reverse.empty()){
            char temp =reverse.pop();
            if(temp==' '){
                //get the stack content out append to StringBuilder
                while (!t.empty()){
                    char c =t.pop();
                    sb.append(c);
                }
                sb.append(' ');
            }else{
                //push to stack
                t.push(temp);
            }
        }
        while (!t.empty()){
            char c =t.pop();
            sb.append(c);
        }
        return sb.toString();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string s1 =" My Name varma:;
        string[] arr = s1.Split(' ');
        Array.Reverse(arr);
        string str = string.Join(" ", arr);
        Console.WriteLine(str);
        Console.ReadLine();

    }
}
share|improve this answer

Actually, the first answer:

words = aString.split(" ");
for (i = 0; i < words.length; i++) {
    words[i] = words[words.length-i];
}

does not work because it undoes in the second half of the loop the work it did in the first half. So, i < words.length/2 would work, but a clearer example is this:

words = aString.split(" "); // make up a list
i = 0; j = words.length - 1; // find the first and last elements
while (i < j) {
    temp = words[i]; words[i] = words[j]; words[j] = temp; //i.e. swap the elements
    i++; 
    j--;
}

Note: I am not familiar with the PHP syntax, and I have guessed incrementer and decrementer syntax since it seems to be similar to Perl.

share|improve this answer

How about ...

var words = "My name is X Y Z";
var wr = String.Join( " ", words.Split(' ').Reverse().ToArray() );

I guess that's not in-line tho.

share|improve this answer

In c, this is how you might do it, O(N) and only using O(1) data structures (i.e. a char).

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
main(){
  char* a = malloc(1000);
  fscanf(stdin, "%[^\0\n]", a);
  int x = 0, y;
  while(a[x]!='\0')
  {
    if (a[x]==' ' || a[x]=='\n')
    {
      x++;
    }
    else
    {
      y=x;
      while(a[y]!='\0' && a[y]!=' ' && a[y]!='\n')
      { 
        y++;
      }
      int z=y;
      while(x<y)
      {
        y--;
        char c=a[x];a[x]=a[y];a[y]=c; 
        x++;
      }
      x=z;
    }
  }

  fprintf(stdout,a);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

It can be done more simple using sscanf:

void revertWords(char *s);
void revertString(char *s, int start, int n);
void revertWordsInString(char *s);

void revertString(char *s, int start, int end)
{
     while(start<end)
     {
         char temp = s[start];
         s[start] = s[end];
         s[end]=temp;
         start++;
         end --;
     }
}


void revertWords(char *s)
{
  int start = 0;

  char *temp = (char *)malloc(strlen(s) + 1);
  int numCharacters = 0;
  while(sscanf(&s[start], "%s", temp) !=EOF)
  {
      numCharacters = strlen(temp);

      revertString(s, start, start+numCharacters -1);
      start = start+numCharacters + 1;
      if(s[start-1] == 0)
      return;

  }
  free (temp);

}

void revertWordsInString(char *s)
{
   revertString(s,0, strlen(s)-1);
   revertWords(s);
}

int main()
{
   char *s= new char [strlen("abc deff gh1 jkl")+1];
   strcpy(s,"abc deff gh1 jkl");
   revertWordsInString(s);
   printf("%s",s);
   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
import java.util.Scanner;

public class revString {
   static char[] str;

   public static void main(String[] args) {
    //Initialize string
    //str = new char[] { 'h', 'e', 'l', 'l', 'o', ' ', 'a', ' ', 'w', 'o',
    //'r', 'l', 'd' };
    getInput();

    // reverse entire string
    reverse(0, str.length - 1);

    // reverse the words (delimeted by space) back to normal
    int i = 0, j = 0;
    while (j < str.length) {

        if (str[j] == ' ' || j == str.length - 1) {

            int m = i;
            int n;

            //dont include space in the swap. 
            //(special case is end of line)
            if (j == str.length - 1)
                n = j;
            else
                n = j -1;


            //reuse reverse
            reverse(m, n);

            i = j + 1;

        }
        j++;
    }

    displayArray();
}

private static void reverse(int i, int j) {

    while (i < j) {

        char temp;
        temp = str[i];
        str[i] = str[j];
        str[j] = temp;

        i++;
        j--;
    }
}
private static void getInput() {
    System.out.print("Enter string to reverse: ");
    Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
    str = scan.nextLine().trim().toCharArray(); 
}

private static void displayArray() {
    //Print the array
    for (int i = 0; i < str.length; i++) {
        System.out.print(str[i]);
    }
}

}

share|improve this answer

In Java using an additional String (with StringBuilder):

public static final String reverseWordsWithAdditionalStorage(String string) {
    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();

    char c = 0;
    int index = 0;
    int last = string.length();
    int length = string.length()-1;
    StringBuilder temp = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i=length; i>=0; i--) {
        c = string.charAt(i);
        if (c == SPACE || i==0) {
            index = (i==0)?0:i+1;
            temp.append(string.substring(index, last));
            if (index!=0) temp.append(c);
            builder.append(temp);
            temp.delete(0, temp.length());
            last = i;
        }
    }

    return builder.toString();
}

In Java in-place:

public static final String reverseWordsInPlace(String string) {
    char[] chars = string.toCharArray();

    int lengthI = 0;
    int lastI = 0;
    int lengthJ = 0;
    int lastJ = chars.length-1;

    int i = 0;
    char iChar = 0;
    char jChar = 0;
    while (i<chars.length && i<=lastJ) {
        iChar = chars[i];
        if (iChar == SPACE) {
            lengthI = i-lastI;
            for (int j=lastJ; j>=i; j--) {
                jChar = chars[j];
                if (jChar == SPACE) {
                    lengthJ = lastJ-j;
                    swapWords(lastI, i-1, j+1, lastJ, chars);
                    lastJ = lastJ-lengthI-1;
                    break;
                }
            }
            lastI = lastI+lengthJ+1;
            i = lastI;
        } else {
            i++;
        }
    }

    return String.valueOf(chars);
}

private static final void swapWords(int startA, int endA, int startB, int endB, char[] array) {
    int lengthA = endA-startA+1;
    int lengthB = endB-startB+1;

    int length = lengthA;
    if (lengthA>lengthB) length = lengthB;

    int indexA = 0;
    int indexB = 0;
    char c = 0;
    for (int i=0; i<length; i++) {
        indexA = startA+i;
        indexB = startB+i;

        c = array[indexB];
        array[indexB] = array[indexA];
        array[indexA] = c;
    }

    if (lengthB>lengthA) {
        length = lengthB-lengthA;
        int end = 0;
        for (int i=0; i<length; i++) {
            end = endB-((length-1)-i);
            c = array[end];
            shiftRight(endA+i,end,array);
            array[endA+1+i] = c;
        }
    } else if (lengthA>lengthB) {
        length = lengthA-lengthB;
        for (int i=0; i<length; i++) {
            c = array[endA];
            shiftLeft(endA,endB,array);
            array[endB+i] = c;
        }
    }
}

private static final void shiftRight(int start, int end, char[] array) {
    for (int i=end; i>start; i--) {
        array[i] = array[i-1];
    }
}

private static final void shiftLeft(int start, int end, char[] array) {
    for (int i=start; i<end; i++) {
        array[i] = array[i+1];
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Here is a C implementation that is doing the word reversing inlace, and it has O(n) complexity.

char* reverse(char *str, char wordend=0)
{
    char c;
    size_t len = 0;
    if (wordend==0) {
        len = strlen(str);
    }
    else {
        for(size_t i=0;str[i]!=wordend && str[i]!=0;i++)
            len = i+1;
    }
            for(size_t i=0;i<len/2;i++) {
                c = str[i];
                str[i] = str[len-i-1];
                str[len-i-1] = c;
            }
    return str;
}

char* inplace_reverse_words(char *w)
{
    reverse(w); // reverse all letters first
    bool is_word_start = (w[0]!=0x20);

    for(size_t i=0;i<strlen(w);i++){
        if(w[i]!=0x20 && is_word_start) {
            reverse(&w[i], 0x20); // reverse one word only
            is_word_start = false;
        }
        if (!is_word_start && w[i]==0x20) // found new word
            is_word_start = true;
    }
    return w;
}
share|improve this answer

c# solution to reverse words in a sentence

using System;
class helloworld {
    public void ReverseString(String[] words) {
        int end = words.Length-1;
        for (int start = 0; start < end; start++) {
            String tempc;
            if (start < end ) {
                tempc = words[start];
                words[start] = words[end];
                words[end--] = tempc;
            }
        }
        foreach (String s1 in words) {
            Console.Write("{0} ",s1);
        }
    }
}
class reverse {
    static void Main() {
        string s= "beauty lies in the heart of the peaople";
        String[] sent_char=s.Split(' ');
        helloworld h1 = new helloworld();
        h1.ReverseString(sent_char);
    }
}

output: peaople the of heart the in lies beauty Press any key to continue . . .

share|improve this answer

Better version
Check my blog http://bamaracoulibaly.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/19-reverse-order-of-words-in-text.html

public string reverseTheWords(string description)
{
    if(!(string.IsNullOrEmpty(description)) && (description.IndexOf(" ") > 1))
    {
        string[] words= description.Split(' ');
        Array.Reverse(words);
        foreach (string word in words)
        {
            string phrase = string.Join(" ", words);
            Console.WriteLine(phrase);
        }
        return phrase;
    }
    return description;
}
share|improve this answer
public class manip{

public static char[] rev(char[] a,int left,int right) {
    char temp;
    for (int i=0;i<(right - left)/2;i++)    {
        temp = a[i + left];
        a[i + left] = a[right -i -1];
        a[right -i -1] = temp;
    }

    return a;
}
public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {

    String s= "i think this works";
    char[] str = s.toCharArray();       
    int i=0;
    rev(str,i,s.length());
    int j=0;
    while(j < str.length) {
        if (str[j] != ' ' && j != str.length -1) {
            j++;
        } else
        {
            if (j == (str.length -1))   {
                j++;
            }
            rev(str,i,j);
            i=j+1;
            j=i;
        }
    }
    System.out.println(str);
}
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I know there are several correct answers. Here is the one in C that I came up with. This is an implementation of the excepted answer. Time complexity is O(n) and no extra string is used.

#include<stdio.h>

char * strRev(char *str, char tok)
{
   int len = 0, i;
   char *temp = str;
   char swap;

   while(*temp != tok && *temp != '\0') {
      len++; temp++;
   }   
   len--;

   for(i = 0; i < len/2; i++) {
      swap = str[i];
      str[i] = str[len - i]; 
      str[len - i] = swap;
   }   

   // Return pointer to the next token.
   return str + len + 1;
}

int main(void)
{
   char a[] = "Reverse this string.";
   char *temp = a;

   if (a == NULL)
      return -1; 

   // Reverse whole string character by character.
   strRev(a, '\0');

   // Reverse every word in the string again.
   while(1) {
      temp = strRev(temp, ' ');
      if (*temp == '\0')
         break;

      temp++;
   }   
   printf("Reversed string: %s\n", a); 
   return 0;
}
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Usage

char str[50] = {0};
strcpy(str, (char*)"My name is Khan");
reverseWords(str);

Method

void reverseWords(char* pString){
    if(NULL ==pString){
        return;
    }
    int nLen     = strlen(pString);
    reverseString(pString,nLen);
    char* start  = pString;
    char* end    = pString;
    nLen         = 0;
    while (*end) {
        if(*end == ' ' ){
            reverseString(start,nLen);
            end++;
            start = end;
            nLen  = 0;
            continue;
        }
        nLen++;
        end++;
    }
    reverseString(start,nLen);
    printf("\n Reversed: %s",pString);

}


void reverseString(char* start,int nLen){
    char* end = start+ nLen-1;
    while(nLen > 0){
        char temp = *start;
        *start    = *end;
        *end      = temp;
        end--;
        start++;
        nLen-=2;
    }
}
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This is how you solve it in TCL no matter how many spaces or tabs or new lines (\n) characters exist in your string. this is a real life solution and the human way of thinking. It does not consider one and only one space is a mark of a new word.

And i think in C/C++ and Java you can translate it the same way.

I worked on it for two days before this posting, because i did not accept that there exist functions provided by the library of the language which are also made for us, and we don't use them.

<!-- language: lang-php -->
# 1- Reverse the orignial text
set reversed [ string reverse  $all_original_text] 

# 2- split the reversed string $reversed into a list of words then loop over them
set list_of_reversed_words [split $reversed  ]

foreach reversed_words $list_of_reversed_words {

# 3- find the indices of the extremes of each reversed word in the $reversed

set word_start [ string first $reversed_words $reversed $word_start]
set word_end [ expr $word_start -1 + [string length $letter] ]

# 4- reverse the current-in-the-loop reversed word back to its normal state, e.g: 
# if i have a word "loohcs" then convert it by reversing it to "school"

set original_word [string reverse [ string range $reversed $word_start $word_end] ]

# 5- replace  the reversed word (loohcs) with the correcte one (school)

set reversed [ string replace $reversed $word_start $word_end $original_word]

# 6- set the start-of-search index to the index 
# directly after the ending of the current word

set word_start [expr $word_end +1]

# 7-continue to the next loop  
}

#print the result
puts "finally: $reversed"
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public class StringReverse {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    StringReverse sr =new StringReverse();
    String output=sr.reverse("reverse this string");

    String substring="";
    for(int i=0;i<=output.length();i++)
        {
        if(i==output.length()){
            System.out.print(sr.reverse(substring));
            substring="";
        }else if(output.charAt(i)==' ' ){
            System.out.print(sr.reverse(substring+" "));
            substring="";

        }
        if(i<output.length())
        {
        substring+=output.charAt(i);}
        }

}

public String reverse(String str){
    char[] value=str.toCharArray();
    int count=str.length();
    int n = count - 1;
    for (int j = (n-1) >> 1; j >= 0; --j) {
        char temp = value[j];
        value[j] = value[n - j];
        value[n - j] = temp;
    }
    return new String(value);
}

}

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#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <strings.h>

void reverse(char *data, int len) {
    int counter = 0;
    int end = len - 1;
    char temp;

    for (counter = 0; counter < len / 2; counter++, end--) {
        temp = data[counter];
        data[counter] = data[end];
        data[end] = temp;
    }
}

int main(void) {
    char data[] = "This is a line and needs to be reverse by words!";
    int c = 0;
    int len = strlen(data);
    int wl = 0;
    int start = 0;
    printf("\n    data =  %s", data);
    reverse(data, len);

    for (c = 0; c < len; c++) {
        if (!wl) {
            start = c;
        }
        if (data[c] != ' ') {
            wl++;
        } else {
            reverse(data + start, wl);
            wl = 0;
        }

    }

    printf("\nnow data =  %s", data);
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
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Using Java :

String newString = "";
String a = "My name is X Y Z";
    int n = a.length();
    int k = n-1;
    int j=0;

    for (int i=n-1; i>=0; i--)
    {
        if (a.charAt(i) == ' ' || i==0)
        {

            j= (i!=0)?i+1:i;

            while(j<=k)
            {
                newString = newString + a.charAt(j);
                j=j+1;
            }
            newString = newString + " ";
            k=i-1;
        }

    }
    System.out.println(newString);

Complexity is O(n) [traversing entire array] + O(n) [traversing each word again] = O(n)

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