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In the "Scaling Up Your Data Warehouse with SQL Server 2008 R2" the author recommends using a integer date key in the format of YYYYMMDD as a clustered index on your fact tables to help optimize query speed.

What is the best way to convert your key date field to the Date Key? I feel the following would work, but is a bit sloppy:

select Replace(CONVERT(varchar,GETDATE(),102),'.','')

Clearly, I'm not using getdate, but rather a date column in the table that will be using in my aggregrations.

First, how would you suggest making this conversion? Is my idea acceptable?

Second, has anyone had much success using the Date Key as a clustered index?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

ISO long (112) would do the trick:

SELECT CONVERT(INT, CONVERT(VARCHAR(8), GETDATE(), 112))

Casting getdate() straight to int with ISO 112 gives 41008 for some reason, but going via a VARCHAR seems to work - i'll update if i think of a faster cast.

EDIT: In regards to the int only vs varchar debate, here are my findings (repeatable on my test rig & production server) Varchar method uses less cpu time for half a million casts but a fraction slower overall - negligible unless your dealing with billions of rows

EDIT 2: Revised test case to clear cache and differnt dates

DBCC FREEPROCCACHE;
DBCC DROPCLEANBUFFERS;
SET STATISTICS TIME ON;
WITH    RawDates ( [Date] )
          AS ( SELECT TOP 500000
                        DATEADD(DAY, N, GETDATE())
               FROM     TALLY
             )
    SELECT  YEAR([Date]) * 10000 + MONTH([Date]) * 100 + DAY([Date])
    FROM    RawDates
SET STATISTICS TIME OFF 

(500000 row(s) affected)

 SQL Server Execution Times:
   CPU time = 218 ms,  elapsed time = 255ms.    
DBCC FREEPROCCACHE;
DBCC DROPCLEANBUFFERS;
SET STATISTICS TIME ON;
WITH    RawDates ( [Date] )
          AS ( SELECT TOP 500000
                        DATEADD(DAY, N, GETDATE())
               FROM     TALLY
             )
    SELECT  CONVERT(INT, CONVERT(VARCHAR(8), [Date], 112))
    FROM    RawDates
SET STATISTICS TIME OFF 

(500000 row(s) affected)

 SQL Server Execution Times:
   CPU time = 266 ms,  elapsed time = 602ms
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1  
converting getdate() straight to INT with IS 112 gives 41008 because that is number of days since the date 0. You can validate by comparing that result to the result of DATEDIFF between 0 and GETDATE(). SELECT CONVERT(INT, GETDATE(), 112), DATEDIFF(day,0,GETDATE()) –  Adam Porad Apr 10 '12 at 16:02
    
@AdamPorad +1 Cheers for clarifying that –  HeavenCore Apr 10 '12 at 16:05
1  
I think your test is flawed. The difference in elapsed time is a result of displaying the long list of values to the screen. Also, you are using GetDate() so SQL Server recognizes it as a constant and does not actually perform the calculation for each row. You need to use a column from the actual table. Lastly, to accurately test performance, you need to drop clean buffers and free the procedure cache. You should not do this on a production server. –  G Mastros Apr 10 '12 at 17:44
    
@GMastros Good points, i've revised my test code, there still seems to be very little difference (varchar is perhaps 40ms or so slower for 500000 rows, the elapsed time is not the amount of time it takes to display the long list, that acutally takes 7+ seconds. –  HeavenCore Apr 10 '12 at 18:02
    
@HeavenCore You may be right about the elapsed time. I usually declare a variable and assign the results to the variable. Ex: Declare Trash Int; Select Trash = Convert(int, ....). I do agree that the time difference is very small in this case. –  G Mastros Apr 10 '12 at 18:33

Instead of creating a DateKey using the YYYYMMDD format, you could use the DATEDIFF function to get the number of days between 0 (i.e. "the date represented by 0") and the date you're making the DateKey for.

SELECT DATEDIFF(day,0,GETDATE())

The drawback is that you can't easily look at the value and determine the date, but you can use the DATEADD function to calculate the original date (I've also seen this trick used truncate the time part of a datetime).

SELECT DATEADD(day, 41007, 0)

(Note: 41007 is the result of the DATEDIFF function above when I ran it on 4/10/2012.)

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Converting to strings and back again can be surprisingly slow. Instead, you could deal entirely with integers, like this:

Select Year(GetDate()) * 10000 + Month(GetDate()) * 100 + Day(GetDate()) 

In my brief testing, this is slightly faster than converting to string and then to int. The Year, Month and Day function each returns an integer, so the performance is slightly better.

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