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I have a situation where I need to retrieve data from a query which executes for almost half a minute and bring it to a web page. (There is no way to reduce this time because the maximum amount of optimization has been performed on it) I use a four layer architecture along with Entity Framework ( EF, Data Access Layer, Biz Logic Layer, UI) for my application. I'm trying to use the singleton method when an instance to the DAL is created (The DAL in turn retrieves data from the database) so that I will be able to re-use this instance and hence additional instances wont be created within the same session. How do I go about setting the session state and checking the availability of the instance in the State Server?

public static Singleton getInstance() {
     if (**instance == null**)
       instance = new Singleton();
     return instance;
   }

What should reside within the if block? What condition should I check for in the if block? I'm really unsure as to what I must do.

PS: This session must have a timeout of 5 mins. I hear this can be specified in the Web.config file. is it true?

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Session is a name value collection. Get the instance of your DAL by name and then check if the value is null. If it is not null, then cast it into an instance of your DAL. For what it's worth, I would not follow this pattern. What is so expensive about the creation of your DAL that you want to avoid creating and disposing of an instance for each request? –  Maess Apr 10 '12 at 15:42
3  
Are you creating a separate DAL for each user session? Why would the DAL be session-specific at all? Can't you just have a factory for the DAL with a static property on it? When the property is called, see if the factory's static member of the DAL instance is null. If it is, instantiate and return. If not, just return. –  David Apr 10 '12 at 15:45
1  
Can you post the contents of the DAL in question? The fact that you want to keep the instance alive can raise some additional problems that you should be aware of, such as keeping the connection open, etc. –  Shai Cohen Apr 10 '12 at 15:50
2  
@krishna: The stored procedure is fired every time the DAL is created? That seems... strange. Usually a DAL facilitates the code's ability to call database resources, it shouldn't call those resources internally when the application doesn't need them yet. Also, what do you mean by "we want the data to not disappear on refresh"? That sounds like you want to manage the data itself in the session (or in any number of other state management approaches), not the DAL itself. And it sounds like you're creating a new DAL for every session. So every user has their own. That also sounds wrong. –  David Apr 10 '12 at 16:20
2  
@krishna: I don't mean to sound overly-critical about your code, especially since we can't see any of your code aside from the very small snippet in the question. It just sounds like you're looking for advice to proceed on an already flawed premise. And that premise is at a severe disconnect from what the rest of us would normally expect to see, so we can't really formulate a coherent answer. –  David Apr 10 '12 at 16:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To be honest you should rather use Entity Framework context and create it every time you need access to database, i.e. in each method. It is optimized to be used that way. Connection pooling will make sure there is not penalty in recreating EF context each time. This is the best practice.

But your DAL might be more than just simple DB access. If you want to have it as a singleton separate for each session you must create the instance on the first request, store it into the Session and check if it's there before using. With thread safety the code could look like that:

class DALClass
{
    private static object instanceLock = new object();

    public static DALClass Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if (Session["DALInstance"] == null)
            {
                lock (instanceLock)
                {
                    if (Session["DALInstance"] == null)
                    {
                        Session["DALInstance"] = new DALClass();
                    }
                }
            }

            return (DALClass)Session["DALInstance"];
        }
    }
}
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I don't think the DAL object should be a singleton or cached in the session. Cache the results yes but not the object doing the work. At most the DAL should be handled by the DI and created on a once per web request see the castle docs: stw.castleproject.org/… –  Michael Ciba Apr 10 '12 at 22:24
    
As I pointed in my answer, having DAL in the Session is not best idea. Unless there is more to it we do not know. –  Maciej Apr 11 '12 at 7:38
    
@Maciej : I put the context to the entities in the session. Is that fine? –  bundleofjoy Apr 11 '12 at 14:37
    
@krishna, If you mean Entity Framework context (class inheriting from ObjectContext) then you should create it every time you need to use it, in each method. Do not treat it as new DB connection because it is not and it is relatively inexpensive to create. –  Maciej Apr 11 '12 at 15:06

It sounds to me like you have a well defined architecture which would suit dependency injection. Using DI you could just get your IOC container to return you a singleton object or a transient one. However, be very careful using singletons in a web environment as they often cause more trouble than they are worth.

If the query you are running contains user specific data then I would probably place the results of that query into session within the code which composes the UI part of your application if you are using a pattern like MVC that would be in the controller or MVP in the presenter.

If these patterns aren’t in use then you could consider placing the information into session inside the business layer but only if you wrap up the session and inject in that dependency into your business object, e.g. something like “IUserSession”. The business project should not contain a reference to “system.Web” or anything like that.

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Key point here is that the results of the query (not the DAL) should go into the session. The Session object itself already has all the characteristics you want: 'additional instances wont be created within the same session.' (Also, if you post your query in an SQL-tagged question, you might get some help in optimising it. 30 seconds is too long for a webpage, unless your users have no choice but to use it.) –  mafue Apr 10 '12 at 16:56

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