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When subtracting timestamps the return value is an interval data-type. Is there an elegant way to convert this value into the total number of (milli/micro) seconds in the interval, i.e. an integer.

The following would work, but it's not very pretty:

select abs( extract( second from interval_difference ) 
          + extract( minute from interval_difference ) * 60 
          + extract( hour from interval_difference ) * 60 * 60 
          + extract( day from interval_difference ) * 60 * 60 * 24
            )
  from ( select systimestamp - (systimestamp - 1) as interval_difference
           from dual )

Is there a more elegant method in SQL or PL/SQL?

share|improve this question
1  
:somewhere i have found this ` select (TRUNC(SYSDATE) + out.interv - TRUNC(SYSDATE)) * 86400 from (select systimestamp -(systimestamp -1) as interv from dual )out` – Gaurav Soni Apr 10 '12 at 20:37
    
since adding the return of the interval in seconds to a fixed precision number variable, the fractional part of the second is lost in the query mentioned in comments – Gaurav Soni Apr 10 '12 at 20:40
up vote 11 down vote accepted

I hope this help:

zep@dev> select interval_difference
      2        ,sysdate + (interval_difference * 86400) - sysdate as fract_sec_difference
      3  from   (select systimestamp - (systimestamp - 1) as interval_difference
      4          from   dual)
      5 ;

INTERVAL_DIFFERENCE                                                             FRACT_SEC_DIFFERENCE
------------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------------------
+000000001 00:00:00.375000                                                                 86400,375

With your test:

zep@dev> select interval_difference
      2        ,abs(extract(second from interval_difference) +
      3        extract(minute from interval_difference) * 60 +
      4        extract(hour from interval_difference) * 60 * 60 +
      5        extract(day from interval_difference) * 60 * 60 * 24) as your_sec_difference
      6        ,sysdate + (interval_difference * 86400) - sysdate as fract_sec_difference
      7        ,round(sysdate + (interval_difference * 86400) - sysdate) as sec_difference
      8        ,round((sysdate + (interval_difference * 86400) - sysdate) * 1000) as millisec_difference
      9  from   (select systimestamp - (systimestamp - 1) as interval_difference
     10          from   dual)
     11  /

INTERVAL_DIFFERENCE                                                             YOUR_SEC_DIFFERENCE FRACT_SEC_DIFFERENCE SEC_DIFFERENCE MILLISEC_DIFFERENCE
------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------- -------------------- -------------- -------------------
+000000001 00:00:00.515000                                                                86400,515            86400,515          86401            86400515

zep@dev> 
share|improve this answer
    
I ended up explaining exactly why this works here: stackoverflow.com/a/17413839/458741 – Ben Jul 3 '13 at 20:16
1  
This doesn't work for some values of interval_difference. For example: select interval_difference, sysdate + (interval_difference * 86400) - sysdate as fract_sec_difference from ( select systimestamp - (systimestamp - 1/3) as interval_difference from dual ); – Pedro Pedruzzi Jul 27 '15 at 20:56

Unfortunately, I don't think that there is an alternative (or more elegant) way of calculating total seconds from an interval type in pl/sql. As this article mentions:

... unlike .NET, Oracle provides no simple equivalent to TimeSpan.TotalSeconds.

therefore extracting day, hour etc from the interval and multiplying them with corresponding values seems like the only way.

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I've found this to work. Apparently, if you do arithmetics with timestamps they are converted to some internal datatype that, when substracted from each other, returns the interval as a number.

Easy? Yes. Elegant? No. Gets the work done? Oh yeah.

SELECT ( (A + 0) - (B + 0) ) * 24 * 60 * 60 
FROM
(
   SELECT SYSTIMESTAMP A,
          SYSTIMESTAMP - INTERVAL '1' MINUTE B
   FROM DUAL
);
share|improve this answer
    
This only gives me whole seconds. – vikingsteve Feb 4 '15 at 11:35
    
Oops, true. The question spefically asked for micro/milliseconds. This is an easy way to give whole seconds, though. – Waldo Feb 11 '15 at 11:19
    
CAST(A AS DATE) is equivalent to (A+0) – Andrew Apr 15 at 9:58

Based on zep's answer, I wrapped things up into a function for your convenience:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION intervalToSeconds( 
     pMinuend TIMESTAMP , pSubtrahend TIMESTAMP ) RETURN NUMBER IS

vDifference INTERVAL DAY TO SECOND ; 

vSeconds NUMBER ;

BEGIN 

vDifference := pMinuend - pSubtrahend ;

SELECT EXTRACT( DAY    FROM vDifference ) * 86400
     + EXTRACT( HOUR   FROM vDifference ) *  3600
     + EXTRACT( MINUTE FROM vDifference ) *    60
     + EXTRACT( SECOND FROM vDifference )
  INTO
    vSeconds 
  FROM DUAL ;

  RETURN vSeconds ;

END intervalToSeconds ; 
share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you, but a function is far less efficient than SQL. You'll lose around a millisecond per record in the SQL/PL/SQL context switch alone. There's also no need to select from dual or to assign the result to a variable, you can return it directly. I'd write the same function like this: sqlfiddle.com/#!4/42d23/1. However, I'd like to emphasise that a function should not be used if at all possible. – Ben Jul 3 '13 at 17:12
    
Also, now I come to think about it the code is mine... I was asking if there's a better way of doing it! Welcome to Stack Overflow :-). – Ben Jul 3 '13 at 17:16

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