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I am designing a video files conversion engine.

There are different sources (files with start/end time code, playlist files, various text/XML files describing input files and video/audio effects to apply on these files, ...).

There are different outputs (file or command text file).

There are different tools (mostly dos commands) to run for doing the conversion.

I would like to design an engine that follows the Open/Closed principle to easily add/modify new sources or new outputs.

I want to avoid to have to much classes so inheriting is not an option I think.

I thought about creating a central class Converter.

The engine would create this Converter class from the sources and would convert the sources to outputs.

I don't know if it is a good approach.

I had a look to the strategy pattern but again, I am not sure this is the appropriate pattern to use.

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as you mention strategy pattern should be fine for this. –  Jalal Apr 10 '12 at 16:06

3 Answers 3

I see two major ways to approach this, both based on a Strategy pattern:

  1. Create a class for every permutation of input and output, that will convert between said input and output, and then put them into a Strategy pattern with a central Converter class that can choose the correct implementation from a collection of implementations it finds or is given.

    • The upside is simplicity, and each existing implementation, once it works, should be "closed" to change based on adding additional input or output types.
    • The downside is that for 5 inputs and 2 outputs, you need 10 implementations. Adding a third output requires developing 5 more classes, one for each input. You will also probably repeat yourself often; consider making all of these classes derive from an abstract base, which you can use to "pull up" common code into one place.
  2. Create a class for each input that can convert that particular input into some intermediate, in-memory format, containing all the information you'd need to produce any output. Then, create a class for each output which will produce said output given the intermediate produced by any given input conversion. Put all of these into a central Converter which will "mix and match" input and output conversions as needed by a particular situation.

    • The upside is that adding a new output type doesn't require you to create as many implementations as there are input types, and vice-versa. You also have less repetitive code; there is ONE way to turn any given input into the intermediate, and ONE way to turn the intermediate into a given output, so you shouldn't find yourself making the same method call in two different implementations (though implementations can still derive from an abstract base to allow for shared code).
    • The downside is increased internal complexity which is more sensitive to change. The intermediary type is required, though nothing outside of your code will ever use it, and should the amount of information that needs to be stored in the intermediary ever change (say to support a new output that needs more info than you currently provide from inputs), you will need to go back and change existing, working code to add the new data that will be needed on the other end.

Which one will work better for you depends on what kinds of change you predict that this system will have to undergo. If you foresee new types of inputs or outputs being added, the intermediary will be the better pattern as it reduces class count (5 inputs, 3 outputs is 8 converters instead of 15); however, you will need to ensure that the intermediary also follows the Open/Closed principle, so new implementations of inputs or outputs that must provide or consume new data can be added, and the intermediary extended, without outright breaking the existing implementations or making certain combinations of input and output incompatible. If you foresee the type or amount of data you will need changing more than how you get it or output it, OR if you foresee such wildly different conversion processes between each input and output that there's not much sense in trying to standardize the process, the implementation per permutation might work better.

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Solution 1 is what I want to avoid. Besides, there are not an output for each input. Solution 2 is what I wanted to do. The problem I want to avoid is to have in the intermediate class lot of data members that are not used. For example, lets say there are 20 data members in the intermediate class, 4 could be needed for output #1, 6 for output #2, 3 for output #3 ... It doesn't seems good code. –  Pierre Apr 11 '12 at 7:47
    
If you go with the second option you will always have to satisfy the greatest common denominator. How much data the intermediary must hold is exactly how much you will need to produce the most detailed or verbose of your outputs, and your input converters must all be able to provide that much data. It doesn't really matter how much more data a particular input converter could provide; if you don't want it in your output, YAGNI. –  KeithS Apr 11 '12 at 14:07
    
The remaining problem is that this pattern is not closed to change in the situation of adding a new output converter that requires additional data. Then, the intermediary must hold more data, and all existing input converters must now populate that data. You can avoid touching working code, but this could lead to a spaghettified model. This is why TDD is such a good idea, especially for systems like this; you can add new things to code while ensuring it still does all the things that it used to. –  KeithS Apr 11 '12 at 14:10
    
I think I will go with the intermediary class (solution 2). I still have a question about it, is it good coding to have all (common) data in the intermediary class ? Let's say there are 20 members data, 4 are used for input #1, 3 for input #2, 5 for input #3, ... I thought about having ISourceFile interface implemented by n concrete class, this concrete class is given to the intermediary class as input so only needed data is provided. Are there any pattern for that ? –  Pierre Apr 12 '12 at 14:18
    
You can do it that way, but then ISourceFile implementations really become your "intermediary"; you can have the "input converters" produce an ISourceFile implementation (however that happens) and pass ISourceFiles to "output converters". As for a name, it's simply a common abstraction; all the various source files are presented using a common interface allowing them to be used interchangeably. –  KeithS Apr 12 '12 at 16:37

You'll likely need a combination of patterns as well as some practical application of not-pattern code. The strategy pattern is good for filling in 'how do I load/write this?'. The composite pattern is good for 'stitch these elements together' or 'do this transition effect'. The decorator pattern is good for applying effects overtop of the video.

The sticking point will be providing a common interface that you can implement and decorate in meaningful ways. Without knowing more about what behaviors you're looking to implement, it's hard to say.

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See messages below for more informations. Let's say I have 7 inputs and 5 outputs, I don't want to write 35 (7 * 5) classes (though some combinations are not needed) but 12 (7 + 5) + some "patterns" classes and interfaces. –  Pierre Apr 11 '12 at 7:59
    
I would like to add some existing code but I don't find how to format text and code on this faq website ! –  Pierre Apr 11 '12 at 8:35

Update according to the comment from Pierre:

Define a generic converter as follows:

public interface IVideoConverter
{
     IInputReader  Reader {get;set;}
     IOutputWriter Writer {get;set;}
     void Convert();
}

Define the interfaces:

public interface IInputReader
{
    bool IsSUpported(string inputId);

    void AppendToBuffer(Buffer buffer);
}

public interface IOutputWriter
{
    bool IsSUpported(string outputId);

    void WriteFromBuffer(Buffer buffer);
}

Write class that implements the converter:

public class VideoConverter : IVideoConverter
{
   ...       
}

Write 3 factories:

public class InputReaderFactory
{
   public IInputReader GetReader(string inputId)
   {
       ...
   }
}

public class OutputWriterFactory
{
   public IOutputWriter GetWriter(string outputId)
   {
      ...
   }
}

public class VideoConverterFactory
{
   public IVideoConverter GetConverter(string inputId, string outputId)
   {
      ...
   } 
}

In each factory use any method you want to construct the instance that the factory responsible of. The VideoConverterFactory should use the reader and writer factories

There are several ways to implement the concrete type intialization. I will describe 2:

a) Create a static readonly array or list of all supported types and search in this list for the first converter that supports the given input parameter(s).

 public class InputReaderFactory
 {
   private static readonly IEnumerable<IInputReader> SupportedReaders = new IInputReader[] {new Reader1(), new Reader2(),....}
   public IInputReader GetReader(string inputId)
   {
      for(int i=0; i<SupportedReaders .length; i++)
      {
        if(SupportedReaders [i].IsSupported(inputId)
          return SupportedReaders [i];
      }

      return null;
   }
}

b) Define the supported types in configuration file (implement configuration element, configuration collection and section for that) and in the factory class search the supported converter from the configuration and when finding one, create an instance using reflection

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That is exactly the kind of design I started. But as written in the above message, I was thinking about a central/intermediate class between input parameters and output result to avoid too much classes. –  Pierre Apr 11 '12 at 7:54
    
I updated the answer based on your comment –  Koby Mizrahy Apr 11 '12 at 12:28
    
It looks nice but you didn't answer my last question: how do you prevent VideoConverter classes explosion ? I mean there could be a lof of VideoConverter classes. Besides how do you prevent code duplication ? For example if you have n VideoConverter from the same InputReader to n different OutputWriter or the opposite, n InputReader to the same OutputWriter ? –  Pierre Apr 12 '12 at 10:36
    
Pierre, In the above design you have only 1 video converter class. You have no duplication because you have exactly 1 class for each inmput and 1 class for each output. the binding between the input and output is done in the VideoConverterFactory which create instance of input reader, output writer and bind them to the video converter. The video converter is generic, universal converter which can work with any input reader and output writer since they are all implement the same inteface. –  Koby Mizrahy Apr 15 '12 at 5:43
    
OK I missed something. I thought that the VideoConverterFactory should return a different video converter for each input/output combination. I am not sure to understand why one should need the IVideoConverter in this case because, if I understand well, the GetConverter function will always return the same class, i.e. VideoConverter. –  Pierre Apr 16 '12 at 13:14

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