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How do I perform vector addition in Ruby so that

[100, 100] + [2, 3]

yields

[102, 103]

(instead of joining two arrays)?

Or it can be another operator too, such as

[100, 100] @ [2, 3]

or

[100, 100] & [2, 3]
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If this were lisp, the solution would be to use map: (map + '(100 100) '(2 3)) => (102 103). Maybe Ruby has a similar function? –  Kyle Cronin Jun 17 '09 at 20:16
1  
I don't program in Ruby at all but it seems to me that there is Vector type provided by a core module lib/matrix.rb. Why is everyone reinventing the functionality of this module? –  Sinan Ünür Jun 18 '09 at 4:59
    
Do you think your question has not been answered adequately yet? If so, how can the answers be improved upon? –  Sinan Ünür Jun 25 '09 at 0:26
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6 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

See the Vector class:

require "matrix"

x = Vector[100, 100]
y = Vector[2, 3]
print x + y

E:\Home> ruby t.rb
Vector[102, 103]
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Array#zip:

$ irb
irb(main):001:0> [100,100].zip([2,3]).map { |e| e.first + e.last }
=> [102, 103]

Shorter:

irb(main):002:0> [100,100].zip([2,3]).map { |x,y| x + y }
=> [102, 103]

Generalized to >2 dimensions with #inject:

irb(main):003:0> [100,100,100].zip([2,3,4]).map { |z| z.inject(&:+) }
=> [102, 103, 104]
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Or if you want arbitrary dimension behavior of that variety (like mathematical vector addition)

 class Vector < Array
   def +(other)
     case other
     when Array
       raise "Incorrect Dimensions" unless self.size == other.size
       other = other.dup
       self.class.new(map{|i| i + other.shift})
     else
       super
     end
   end
 end

class Array
  def to_vector
    Vector.new(self)
  end
end 

[100,100].to_vector + [2,3] #=> [102,103]

The lack of a lisp style map is quite obnoxious.

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When in Rome..monkeypatch.

module Enumerable
  def sum
    inject &:+
  end

  def vector_add(*others)
    zip(*others).collect &:sum
  end
end

Then you can do a.vector_add(b) and it works. I believe this requires Ruby 1.8.7, or an extension that adds Symbol.to_proc. You can also add an arbitrary number of vectors this way.

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module PixelAddition
  def +(other)
    zip(other).map {|num| num[0]+num[1]}
  end
end

Then you can either create an Array subclass that mixes in the module, or add the behavior to specific arrays like:

class <<an_array
  include PixelAddition
end
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1  
Great use of modules, but having some instances of Array interpret the + operator in a different way than other instances really scares me. You might even get situations where (a + b) != (b + a). –  molf Jun 17 '09 at 22:13
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Just as a sidenote, if you (like me) felt unsatisfied with the operations that are provided by the default Vector class from ruby, consider giving my gem https://github.com/psorowka/vectorops a look, which adds some functionality I would expect from a proper Vector implementation.

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