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I am attempting to use mocks in my integration test and am not having much luck. I am using Spring 3.1.1 and Mockito 1.9.0, and the situation is as follows:

@Component
public class ClassToTest {

    @Resource
    private Dependency dependency;

}

and

@Component
public class Dependency {

    @Resource
    private NestedDependency nestedDependency;

}

Now, I want to do an integration test of ClassToTest using Spring's JavaConfig. This is what I have attempted, and it doesn't work:

@Test
@ContextConfiguration
public class ClassToTestIntegrationTest {

    @Resource
    private ClassToTest classToTest;

    @Resource
    private Dependency mockDependency;

    @Test
    public void someTest() {
        verify(mockDependency).doStuff();

        // other Mockito magic...

    }


    @Configuration
    static class Config {

        @Bean
        public ClassToTest classToTest() {
            return new ClassToTest();
        }

        @Bean
        public Dependency dependency() {
            return Mockito.mock(Dependency.class);
        }

    }
}

I have simplified my setup to make the question easier to understand. In reality I have more dependencies and only want to mock some of them - the others are real, based on config imported from my prod @Configuration classes.

What ends up happening is I get a NoSuchBeanDefinitionException saying that there are no beans of type NestedDependency in the application context. I don't understand this - I thought Spring would receive Mockito's mocked instance of Dependency and not even look at autowiring it. Since this isn't working I end up having to mock my entire object graph - which completely defeats the point of mocking!

Thanks in advance for any help!

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

What Mockito does when mocking classes is it creates a subclass using having some fancy name like: Dependency$EnhancerByMockito (IIRC). As you probably know, subclasses inherit fields from their parent:

@Component
public class Dependency {

    @Resource
    private NestedDependency nestedDependency;

}


public class Dependency$EnhancerByMockito extends Dependency{
    //...
}

This means Spring still sees the field in base class when presented with mock. What you can do:

  1. Use interfaces, which will cause Mockito to employ dynamic proxies rather than CGLIB-generated classes

  2. Mock NestedDependency - I know it will just cascade the problem one level further

  3. Disable @Resource annotation scanning for tests

share|improve this answer
    
Do Mockito's cglib subclasses also inherit the private fields?? – Tom McIntyre Apr 11 '12 at 8:57
    
@TomMcIntyre: actually it has nothing to do with Mockito/CGLIB. If you create SubDependency extends Dependency ordinary class, Spring (via reflection) will still find private fields declared in base class. CGLIB-generated classes are no exception. – Tomasz Nurkiewicz Apr 11 '12 at 9:00
    
@Tomasz You shouldn't use the word inherit as it can be potentially misunderstood. Fields and methods stay in their declaring class, and can be accessible at compile time if their visibility modifier allows it. And at runtime these members in the current class or in the parents can be accessed through reflection. – Brice Apr 11 '12 at 9:38
    
That makes sense then - thank you. – Tom McIntyre Apr 12 '12 at 14:46

I had the same problem and I found another solution. When Spring instantiate all your beans, it will check if it's a Mockito Mock and in this case, I return false for injection property. To use it, just inject it in a Spring context

Code below:

public class MockBeanFactory extends InstantiationAwareBeanPostProcessorAdapter {

    private static final MockUtil mockUtil = new MockUtil();

    public MockBeanFactory() {
        super();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean postProcessAfterInstantiation(Object bean, String beanName) throws BeansException {
        return !mockUtil.isMock(bean);
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, this saved me a lot of heartache! For anyone wondering how to inject it, add a line like this to your Spring application context XML: <bean class="com.stackoverflow.teststuff.MockBeanFactory" /> – Laurence Dougal Myers Aug 21 '13 at 1:24
    
This solved it for me, thank yoU! – dwjohnston Aug 4 '15 at 0:00

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