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I have simple scenario where I have AnotherTest value based on Test value. This works fine most of the time so that whenever I provide Test I am sure to get AnotherTest easily.

public sealed class Transaction {
    public string Test { get;set; }
    public string AnotherTest{
        get {
            int indexLiteryS = Test.IndexOf("S");
            return Test.Substring(indexLiteryS, 4);
        }
    }
}

However I wanted to be able to also set AnotherTest value and be able to read it without having to provide Test value. Is this possible? So kinda 2 types of get based which way it was set. I know I could create 3rdTest but I have some methods that use AnotherTest and other fields and I would have to write overloads of that methods.

Edit:

I read some file supplied by bank. I cut it in pieces put some stuff in Test value and every other field (AnotherTest and similar) of the Transaction gets filled automatically. However later on I would like to read Transaction from SQL that is already in nice format so I don't need to provide Test to get the rest of the fields. I would like to set those fields with set and then be able to use get without setting Test value.

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3  
Your AnotherTest getter is currently recursive, and also mentions LiniaTransakcjiString - are those two meant to actually use Test? –  Jon Skeet Apr 10 '12 at 16:45
    
Yes both are test (copy/pasted) but inserted wrong value –  MadBoy Apr 10 '12 at 16:46
    
So what would it logically mean to set AnotherTest without there being a Test value? It doesn't help that you've given us no real indication of what these properties are intended to represent. –  Jon Skeet Apr 10 '12 at 16:48
    
@KevinCoulombe it was a copy/paste/hand edit error. Typo :-) –  MadBoy Apr 10 '12 at 16:48
1  
Based on the information given, these properties best implemented as methods as they will convey design decision better. –  Aliostad Apr 10 '12 at 16:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, like so:

public string Test { get; set; }

public string AnotherTest
{
   get
   {
      if(_anotherTest != null || Test == null)
         return _anotherTest;

      int indexLiteryS = Test.IndexOf("S")
      return Test.Substring(indexLiteryS, 4);
   }
   set { _anotherTest = value; }
}
private string _anotherTest;

That getter could also be expressed as

return (_anotherTest != null || Test == null)
    ? _anotherTest
    : Test.Substring(Test.IndexOf("S"), 4);
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I think this would do what you want it to do:

public sealed class Transaction {
    public string Test { get;set; }
    public string AnotherTest{
        get {
            if (_anotherTest != null)
            {
                return _anotherTest;
            }
            else
            {
                int indexLiteryS = Test.IndexOf("S");
                return Test.Substring(indexLiteryS, 4);
            }
        }
        set {
            _anotherTest = value;
        }
    }
    private string _anotherTest = null;
}
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I would suggest turning the problem over.

It sounds like you're dealing with a big field and subfields within it. Instead, how about promoting those subfields to fields and constructing/deconstructing the big field when it's accessed.

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I am deconstructing the big fields provided for me in the file from bank. When it's saved into SQL in clean format it doesn't seem to be a good idea to try to read SQL and construct the same type that bank is sending the information in as it seems overkill and unnecessary job for code. –  MadBoy Apr 10 '12 at 16:57

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