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So, I have bunch of long strings hence thinking of an efficient way to do this operation Suppose I have a string something like

 "< stuff to remove> get this stuff <stuff to remove>

So, I am trying to extract "get this stuff"

So I am writing something like this.

 strt_pos = 0
  end_pos = 0
 while True:
   strt_idx = string.find(start_point, strt_pos) # start_point = "<" in our example
   end_idx  = string.find(end_point, end_pos)   # end_point = ">" in our example
   chunk_to_remove = string[strt_idx:end_idx]
    # Now how do i chop this part off from the string??
   strt_pos = strt_pos + 1
    end_pos = end_pos + 1
   if str_pos >= len(string) # or maybe end_pos >= len(string):
      break

What is the better way to implement this

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2  
Are you tring to parse xml/html? –  Rik Poggi Apr 10 '12 at 17:10
    
I guess the answer will depend on how '< stuff to remove>' and '<stuff to remove>' are defined. They might be fixed, or enclosed in some brackets, like your example, or matchable by a regular expression. Which solution is best depends on the definition of the problem. –  Douglas Leeder Apr 10 '12 at 17:11
    
I think the answers got hung up on your brackets, will they necessarily be there? –  jedwards Apr 10 '12 at 17:12
1  
@Fraz: If you plan to extract data from html regex works only for very specific case (basically if you don't care about the whole structure, for example you might be looking for all the city names in the page). Apart from that to parse an html document you should use an html/xml parser, there are a couple in the std lib and third part from the internet. –  Rik Poggi Apr 10 '12 at 17:39
1  
If you are, in fact, interested interested in efficiency like you say, you actually marked an answer that was more inefficient than your approach. –  jedwards Apr 10 '12 at 17:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use a regular expression:

>>> s = "< stuff to remove> get this stuff <stuff to remove>"
>>> import re
>>> re.sub(r'<[^<>]*>', '', s)
' get this stuff '

The expression <[^<>]*> matches strings that start with <, end with >, and have neither < or > in between. The sub command then replaces the match with the empty string, thus deleting it.

You can then call .strip() on the result to remove the leading and trailing spaces if you want.

Of course, this will fail when you have, for example, nested tags, but it will work for your example.

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This is actually less efficient than the explicit substring method, but its cleaner. If you're interested in efficiency, see my answer. –  jedwards Apr 10 '12 at 17:34

I'm not sure whether the search operation you're doing is part of the question. If you're just saying that you have a start index and an end index and you want to remove those characters from a string, you don't need a special function for that. Python lets you use numeric indices for the characters in strings.

> x="abcdefg"
> x[1:3]
'bc'

The operation you want to perform would be something like x[:strt_idx] + x[end_idx:] . (if you omit the first argument it means "start from the beginning" and if you omit the second one it means "continue to the end".)

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This, but I think he wants the middle rather than the ends, so its actually a lot easier. –  jedwards Apr 10 '12 at 17:18
    
The text talk about "extracting" a string, but the title talks about "removing" it, so I'm not sure. It's an intriguing study in connotation! (: –  octern Apr 10 '12 at 17:21

Regular expressions would be a simple way to do this (although not necessarily faster as shown by jedwards' answer):

import re
s = '< stuff to remove> get this stuff <stuff to remove>'
s = re.sub(r'<[^>]*>', '', s)

After this s would be the string ' get this stuff '.

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This actually is not more efficient. –  jedwards Apr 10 '12 at 17:33

If you have the starting and ending index of the string, you could do something like:

substring = string[s_ind:e_ind]

Where s_ind is the index of the first character you want to include in the string and e_ind is the index of the first character you don't want in the string.

For example

string = "Long string of which I only want a small part"
#         012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234
#         0         1         2         3
substring = string[21:32]
print substring

prints I only want

You could find the indices in the same manner you are now.


Edit: Regarding efficiency, this type of solution is actually more efficient than the regex solution. The reason is there is a lot of overhead involved in regular expressions that you don't necessarily need.

I encourage you to test these things for yourself instead of blindly going on what people claim is most efficient.

Consider the following test program:

#!/bin/env python

import re
import time

def inner_regex(s):
    return re.sub(r'<[^>]*>', '', s)

def inner_substr(s):
    s_ind = s.find('>') + 1
    e_ind = s.find('<', s_ind)
    return s[s_ind:e_ind]


s = '<stuff to remove> get this stuff <stuff to remove>'

tr1 = time.time()
for i in range(100000):
    s1 = inner_regex(s)
tr2 = time.time()
print("Regex:     %f" % (tr2 - tr1))

ts1 = time.time()
for i in range(100000):
    s2 = inner_substr(s)
ts2 = time.time()
print("Substring: %f" % (ts2 - ts1))

the output is:

Regex:     0.511443
Substring: 0.148062

In other words, using the regex approach you are more than 3x slower than your original, corrected approach.


Edit: Regarding the comment about compiled regex, it is faster than uncompiled regex, but still slower than the explicit substring:

#!/bin/env python

import re
import time

def inner_regex(s):
    return re.sub(r'<[^>]*>', '', s)

def inner_regex_compiled(s,r):
    return r.sub('', s)

def inner_substr(s):
    s_ind = s.find('>') + 1
    e_ind = s.find('<', s_ind)
    return s[s_ind:e_ind]


s = '<stuff to remove> get this stuff <stuff to remove>'


tr1 = time.time()
for i in range(100000):
    s1 = inner_regex(s)
tr2 = time.time()


tc1 = time.time()
r = re.compile(r'<[^>]*>')
for i in range(100000):
    s2 = inner_regex_compiled(s,r)
tc2 = time.time()


ts1 = time.time()
for i in range(100000):
    s3 = inner_substr(s)
ts2 = time.time()


print("Regex:          %f" % (tr2 - tr1))
print("Regex Compiled: %f" % (tc2 - tc1))
print("Substring:      %f" % (ts2 - ts1))

Returns:

Regex:          0.512799  # >3 times slower
Regex Compiled: 0.297863  # ~2 times slower
Substring:      0.144910

Moral of the story: While regular expressions are a helpful tool to have in the toolbox, they're simply not as efficient as more straightforward ways when available.

And don't take people's word for things that you can easily test yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
if you want a fair comparison, you'll need to compile the regular expression separately. Something like: bracketed = re.compile(r'<[^<>]*>') and then separately bracketed.sub(s, ''). Also, make sure your definition of "efficient" isn't too narrow. If it takes you 30 min to write a complex function vs 30 seconds to write a regular expression, and it takes <1 sec to run... that's less efficient. –  dhg Apr 10 '12 at 17:46
1  
check your code. I get 0.59 for uncompiled, 0.28 for compiled, and 0.14 for substring. –  dhg Apr 10 '12 at 17:53
1  
@jedwards: You need to define it like this: def inner_regex(s, pattern=re.compile(r'<[^>]*>')): return pattern.sub('', s) –  Rik Poggi Apr 10 '12 at 17:54
1  
Not sure how much this matters, but the functions you are comparing are not equivalent, re.sub() will replace all occurrences but inner_substr() will strip the contents from the first tag. In fact inner_substr() is completely wrong: inner_substr('<1>aaa<2>bbb<3>ccc<4>') => 'aaa' –  Andrew Clark Apr 10 '12 at 18:31
1  
@jedwards - Wrong in the sense that you changed the meaning from <Text to remove> to <...>Text to keep<...>. From a comment from the OP: "the kind of data I got has bunch of these elements in it". –  Andrew Clark Apr 10 '12 at 18:39

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