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I'm new to JPA 2.0 and have troubles annotating a n:m relationship that uses a foreign key class with additional attributes describing the relationship:

Customers can subscribe to several magazines, every Subscription is created for exactly one Customer and one Magazine, additionally saving the duration of the subscription.

Here are my annotated classes, I'm using field access. I've omitted some boilerplate code like constructors, setters, getters (not annotated) and the methods toString, equals and hashCode.

@Entity
public class Customer {
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    private Long id;
    private String name;
    @ManyToMany
    private Set<Subscription> subscriptions;

    // ..
 }

@Entity
public class Magazine {
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    private Long id;
    private String name;

    @ManyToMany
    private Set<Subscription> subscriptions;

    // ..
}

@Entity
public class Subscription {
    private Date start;
    private Date end;

    @EmbeddedId
    private SubscriptionId id;

    // ..
}

@Embeddable
public class SubscriptionId implements Serializable {
    @ManyToOne
    private Customer customer;
    @ManyToOne
    private Magazine magazine;

    // ..
}

I test my annotations by creating and persisting a few objects, like this:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    EntityManagerFactory emf = Persistence
            .createEntityManagerFactory("kiosk");
    EntityManager em = emf.createEntityManager();

    persist(em);

    em.close();
    emf.close();
}

private static void persist(EntityManager em) {
    em.getTransaction().begin();

    Magazine mag1 = new Magazine("mag1");
    Magazine mag2 = new Magazine("mag2");

    Customer cus1 = new Customer("cus1");
    Customer cus2 = new Customer("cus2");
    Customer cus3 = new Customer("cus3");

    Subscription sub1 = new Subscription(cus1, mag1);
    Subscription sub2 = new Subscription(cus2, mag1);
    Subscription sub3 = new Subscription(cus2, mag2);
    Subscription sub4 = new Subscription(cus3, mag2);

    em.persist(mag1);
    em.persist(mag2);

    em.persist(cus1);
    em.persist(cus2);
    em.persist(cus3);

    em.persist(sub1);
    em.persist(sub2);
    em.persist(sub3);
    em.persist(sub4);

    em.getTransaction().commit();
}

The provider creates the following MySQL database:

mysql> show tables;
+-----------------------+
| Tables_in_kiosk       |
+-----------------------+
| customer              |
| customer_subscription |
| magazine              |
| magazine_subscription |
| subscription          |
+-----------------------+

Only the three tables customer, magazine and subscription have contents:

mysql> select * from customer;
+-------------+------+
| customer_id | name |
+-------------+------+
|           1 | cus1 |
|           2 | cus2 |
|           3 | cus3 |
+-------------+------+

mysql> select * from magazine;
+-------------+------+
| magazine_id | name |
+-------------+------+
|           1 | mag1 |
|           2 | mag2 |
+-------------+------+

mysql> select * from subscription;
+------+-------+-------------+-------------+
| end  | start | magazine_id | customer_id |
+------+-------+-------------+-------------+
| NULL | NULL  |           1 |           1 |
| NULL | NULL  |           1 |           2 |
| NULL | NULL  |           2 |           2 |
| NULL | NULL  |           2 |           3 |
+------+-------+-------------+-------------+

I can read my subscriptions if I know their keys. I haven't yet tried to read the whole set for a customer or magazine though.

private static void find(EntityManager em) {
    Magazine mag1 = em.find(Magazine.class, 1L);
    Magazine mag2 = em.find(Magazine.class, 2L);

    Customer cus1 = em.find(Customer.class, 1L);
    Customer cus2 = em.find(Customer.class, 2L);
    Customer cus3 = em.find(Customer.class, 3L);

    Subscription sub1 = em.find(Subscription.class, new SubscriptionId(cus1, mag1));
    Subscription sub2 = em.find(Subscription.class, new SubscriptionId(cus2, mag1));
    Subscription sub3 = em.find(Subscription.class, new SubscriptionId(cus2, mag2));
    Subscription sub4 = em.find(Subscription.class, new SubscriptionId(cus3, mag2));

    System.out.println(mag1);
    System.out.println(mag2);

    System.out.println(cus1);
    System.out.println(cus2);
    System.out.println(cus3);

    System.out.println(sub1);
    System.out.println(sub2);
    System.out.println(sub3);
    System.out.println(sub4);
}

Prints:

Magazine [id=1, name=mag1, subscriptions=null]
Magazine [id=2, name=mag2, subscriptions=null]
Customer [id=1, name=cus1, subscriptions=null]
Customer [id=2, name=cus2, subscriptions=null]
Customer [id=3, name=cus3, subscriptions=null]
Subscription [start=null, end=null, id=SubscriptionId [customer=1, magazine=1]]
Subscription [start=null, end=null, id=SubscriptionId [customer=2, magazine=1]]
Subscription [start=null, end=null, id=SubscriptionId [customer=2, magazine=2]]
Subscription [start=null, end=null, id=SubscriptionId [customer=3, magazine=2]]

The two tables customer_subscription and magazine_subscription remain empty. But as I see it they wouldn't even be necessary - the other 3 tables look exactly like I'd want them to. So my question is:

How do I correctly model the m:n relationship used in this example with JPA 2.0 without creating excess tables while retaining the ability to write and read all subscriptions for a magazine or customer?

In case someone is interested in the code, I've uploaded it here: http://goo.gl/qSc2e; you'll need a MySQL 5 database called 'kiosk' running at port 3306 on localhost with an empty root password.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Your model doesn't actually have any many-to-many relationships.

Customer to Subscription is one-to-many. Magazine to Subscription is one-to-many.

Try this as your entity model:

@Entity
public class Customer {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    private Long id;

    private String name;

    @OneToMany
    private Set<Subscription> subscriptions;

    // ..
 }

@Entity
public class Magazine {
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    private Long id;

    private String name;

    @OneToMany
    private Set<Subscription> subscriptions;

    // ..
}

@Entity
public class Subscription {

    private Date start;

    private Date end;

    @EmbeddedId
    private SubscriptionId id;

    // ..
}

@Embeddable
public class SubscriptionId implements Serializable {

    @ManyToOne
    private Customer customer;

    @ManyToOne
    private Magazine magazine;

    // ..
}

and Hibernate won't generate the redundant link tables.

share|improve this answer
    
You're right about the relationship, but replacing @ManyToMany with @OneToMany didn't change the behavior: JPA/Hibernate still creates two unnecessary and empty tables customer_subscription and magazine_subscription. Or am I missing anything else you've changed in the code? –  riwi Apr 11 '12 at 8:30
    
Did you drop the whole database then let Hibernate regenerate everything? I don't see why it would behave like this. –  darrengorman Apr 11 '12 at 9:44
    
I still had to add mappedBy attributes. I've added an answer of my own which includes both - using @OneToMany as well as the mappedBy attribute. –  riwi Apr 11 '12 at 10:15
    
Good. It's also worth noting this with respect to stating bidirectional relationships. –  darrengorman Apr 11 '12 at 11:25
    
It helped, but didn't solve the problem - for which I've now provided a full solution that I can only mark as the correct answer tomorrow. I appreciate your help and would gladly give you the point, but want to avoid confusing future readers by marking an answer as a solution that doesn't solve the whole problem. –  riwi Apr 11 '12 at 15:05
up vote 1 down vote accepted

milkplusvellocetless's answer is part of the solution, adding mappedBy attributes to the @OneToMany annotations solves the problem:

@Entity
public class Magazine {
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    private Long id;

    @NotNull
    private String name;

    @OneToMany(mappedBy = "id.magazine")
    private Set<Subscription> subscriptions;

    // ..

}

@Entity
public class Customer {
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    private Long id;

    @NotNull
    private String name;

    @OneToMany(mappedBy = "id.customer")
    private Set<Subscription> subscriptions;

    // ..
}

@Entity
public class Subscription {
    private Date start;
    private Date end;

    @EmbeddedId
    private SubscriptionId id;

    // ..
}

@Embeddable
public class SubscriptionId implements Serializable {
    @ManyToOne
    private Customer customer;
    @ManyToOne
    private Magazine magazine;

    // ..
}

Creates only 3 tables (as wanted) instead of 5.

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