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How can I get the name of a file in a directory on unix based on sed, grep, or awk in unix or linux?

I though I could do something like:

    for i in $(ls /tmp/files/date*); do
       if [ $(cat $i | head -n 1 | grep -c "6") >= 1 ] ; then
          echo $i
       fi
    done

I need it to search all of the files in a certain directory (only the first line in them each) and then return which files have the string in them.

Thanks, Tim

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1  
don't parse ls: mywiki.wooledge.org/ParsingLs – glenn jackman Apr 10 '12 at 17:36
    
Don't use ls, the glob itself is enough (and not prone to whitespace/ugly character problems as ls is). – Kevin Apr 10 '12 at 17:37
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can simplify your script a little bit and get the desired result:

for i in /tmp/files/date*; do
   if head -n 1 "$i" | grep -q "6"; then
      basename "$i"
   fi
done
share|improve this answer
    
+1. I'd add -q option to grep and quote "$i". – glenn jackman Apr 10 '12 at 17:37
    
@glennjackman: Yes, you're fully correct. – bmk Apr 10 '12 at 17:42
    
Thank You !!! This is exactly what I was looking for. – cyberboxster Apr 13 '12 at 16:58

There are a number of problems in your code. I'll go through them more or less in order of importance.

  1. You're missing then:
    if [ $(cat $i | head -n 1 | grep -c "6" >= 1) ] ; then
  2. Don't parse ls, the glob is enough:
    for i in /tmp/files/date*; do
  3. The >= should be outside the subshell:
    if [ $(cat $i | head -n 1 | grep -c "6") >= 1 ] ; then
  4. The >= should be -ge to compare numerically:
    if [ $(cat $i | head -n 1 | grep -c "6") -ge 1 ] ; then
  5. Quote "$i" and the subshell, you don't need to quote 6:
    if [ "$(cat "$i" | head -n 1 | grep -c 6)" -ge 1 ] ; then
  6. The return value of grep can be used to control the if (switch -c to -q because you want it quiet and you don't need a count:
    if cat "$i" | head -n 1 | grep -q 6 ; then
  7. You don't need cat here:
    if head -n 1 "$i" | grep -q 6 ; then

So:

for i in /tmp/files/date*; do
   if head -n 1 "$i" | grep -q 6 ; then
      echo $i
   fi
done

Depending on what you're going to be doing with the list, you may want to go about it a different way (find, probably).

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Your resulting script violates your point #1. ;-) – Dennis Williamson Apr 11 '12 at 15:32
    
@DennisWilliamson Oops. Fixed, thanks for catching that. – Kevin Apr 11 '12 at 15:38

You can use basename to get the last part of a path (the filename)

$ basename '/usr/bin/env'
env
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"I need it to search all of the files in a certain directory (only the first line in them each) and then return which files have the string in them."

A combination of find, grep ,cut

find a_certain_directory_name -exec \grep -n -H -m 1 my_search_string {} \; | cut -f 1,2 -d : | grep -e ":1\$" | cut -f 1 -d :
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