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I'm trying to implement Twitter SSO in my iOS5 app and saw Twitter had something called Reverse Auth. Can someone shed some light if this is the correct approach to take. Is Reverse Auth basically getting the access token from the iOS5 app and passing that along to the application server?

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2 Answers 2

You only need to use Reverse Auth if you want to allow a server to make API calls. If you're only interested in letting the iOS app post to Twitter directly, then you don't need Reverse Auth.

For Reverse Auth, see:

https://dev.twitter.com/docs/ios/using-reverse-auth

https://github.com/seancook/TWiOS5ReverseAuthExample

Be sure to request Reverse Auth permissions from Twitter first, or else the sample code won't work.

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Hm, why would one need separate access tokens for the server? once the client receives auth tokens, can't it just pass it to the server? –  Ying Sep 3 '12 at 21:34
    
It's been a while, but iirc they want a distinction between client and server, because client API calls are always directly initiated by the user, while server API calls can be made autonomously (hence, the user must explicitly grant a client app permission to perform reverse auth). Separate tokens allow the user to revoke the server's authorization without having to revoke the client app's authorization. –  Walter K Sep 18 '12 at 0:53

To get your Access Token on Twitter your request must be Authorised Request or Signed request it something like Signed Certificates from Apple when you want to implement Push Notification in your Application.

In Facebook Side these process is made implicitly, but in Twiteer you should Authorize your request first to get user Access Token.

So The main idea n Reverse Auth is these.. you make your First request first with some data like consumer key (which is app key) and consumer secret key.. ( https://api.twitter.com/oauth/request_token )

then you receive a key which you use it in Second request to get the access token.. ( https://api.twitter.com/oauth/access_token )

Twitter is using something called Reverse Auth to answer this 4 questions : 1. Which application is making the request ? 2. Which user the request is posting on behalf of ? 3. Whether the user has granted the application authorisation to post on the user's behalf ? 4. Whether the request has been tampered by a third party while in transit ?

and to answer for these questions they added 7 thing to the request you make

  • oauth_consumer_key
  • oauth_nonce
  • oauth_signature
  • oauth_signature_method
  • oauth_timestamp
  • oauth_token
  • oauth_version

many of people tried to make these by themselves but it will take a lot of time from you to make them by your self and them to your request.

So follow this repo on gitHub https://github.com/seancook/TWReverseAuthExample

also the documentation of Twitter about Reverse Auth https://dev.twitter.com/docs/ios/using-reverse-auth

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