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I have a xml which has several numbers, something like this:

<xml>
<case1>
    <amount>3.140000</amount>
    <amount2>3.0000</amount2>
    <detail>
        <name>something</name>
        <earning>3.1000</earning>
    </detail>
</case1>
<case2>
    <amount>3.10000</amount>
</case2>

The xml is in a single line, and I'm testing with a regex like this:

echo "433.000" | sed -e 's/\([0-9]*\.\)\([1-9]*\)\(0*\)/\1\2/g'

But it gives me something like 3. for 3.00. I'm not trying to parse anything, just remove the zeroes. And somehow, it doesn't do anything when I try with:

sed -e 's/\([0-9]*\.\)\([1-9]*\)\(0*\)/\1\2/g' xmlFile.xml

I have to mention that I'm not good with regular expressions, and I'm on a hosted server, so I can't install any library or program, so only shell is allowed.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
What's the benefit of removing the zeros? –  Bart Kiers Apr 10 '12 at 17:56
1  
And do you mean the "other left" than the conventional one? –  Rowland Shaw Apr 10 '12 at 17:57
    
What do you want the result to be for 3.000 - should it be 3.0 or 3 (which might cause an implicit type change from float to integer - not sure if you want that to happen)? –  Tim Pietzcker Apr 10 '12 at 17:57
1  
@RowlandShaw: It's the left from the computer's point of view, of course. –  Tim Pietzcker Apr 10 '12 at 17:58
    
We need to compare the content of the file against a plain file that doesn't have the zeroes. The xml is produced by Informatica Powercenter, and we can't use XSLT. –  StrayChild01 Apr 10 '12 at 17:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The following should work:

sed -e 's/\(\.[1-9][1-9]*\)0*/\1/g' -e 's/\.00*//' xmlFile.xml

This will result in the following:

<xml>
<case1>
    <amount>3.14</amount>
    <amount2>3</amount2>
    <detail>
        <name>something</name>
        <earning>3.1</earning>
    </detail>
</case1>
<case2>
    <amount>3.1</amount>
</case2>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer! I tried the first option but it tells me that r is an illegal option. Question, when I tried with echo "3.1000" | sed -e 's/(\.[1-9]\+)0*/\1/g' -e 's/\.0\+//' But it gives me the same string. Do you know why? –  StrayChild01 Apr 10 '12 at 18:11
    
@StrayChild01 I removed the -r option since it won't work for you, try the current regex. It is giving you the same string now because the parentheses are not escaped so the first expression is failing to match. –  Andrew Clark Apr 10 '12 at 18:13
    
Hey, I tried the expression with the example, and it is showing me the same content. May be I'm doing something wrong? It is a Solaris 5.9 –  StrayChild01 Apr 10 '12 at 19:55
    
@StrayChild01 - Sorry, I am not very familiar with the differences in Solaris sed. Try changing it to the following in case the \+ is not working: sed -e 's/\(\.[1-9][1-9]*\)0*/\1/g' -e 's/\.00*//' –  Andrew Clark Apr 10 '12 at 20:02
    
It works now!!. –  StrayChild01 Apr 10 '12 at 20:13

You could do this:

sed '{
s/\.00*</</g
s/00*</</g
}' xmlFile.xml
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, I tried with your answer and it gives me a message saying: Command garbled. –  StrayChild01 Apr 10 '12 at 19:45

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