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I'm completely stumped on a query I'm writing in T-SQL. I have a mapping table where book IDs are stored in BookId column and AttributeId is stored in another column.

CREATE TABLE BookMap (
BookId int not null,
AttributeId int not null
)

Each book can have anywhere from 1 to 10 attributes. If book 1 has attributes 3-6, I would like to find books additional books that also have attributes 3-6. For some reason, I cannot think of how to write this query.

Any suggestions?

Here's the edit: To further explain, I have this data:

INSERT INTO BookMap (BookId, AttributeId) VALUES (1, 3);
INSERT INTO BookMap (BookId, AttributeId) VALUES (1, 6);
INSERT INTO BookMap (BookId, AttributeId) VALUES (2, 3);
INSERT INTO BookMap (BookId, AttributeId) VALUES (2, 4);
INSERT INTO BookMap (BookId, AttributeId) VALUES (2, 6);
INSERT INTO BookMap (BookId, AttributeId) VALUES (5, 3);
INSERT INTO BookMap (BookId, AttributeId) VALUES (5, 6);
INSERT INTO BookMap (BookId, AttributeId) VALUES (6, 3);
INSERT INTO BookMap (BookId, AttributeId) VALUES (6, 5);

I would like to query based on BookId = 1 and return BookId's that have exactly 3 and 6, but not more or less. An alternative would be to return a list of BookId's and a percentage match, sort ordered by percentage descending. Either works for my task.

share|improve this question
    
If Book 1 has attributes 3 and 6, do you want a) all books that have an attribute of 3 and all books that have an attribute of 6, or b) only those with BOTH 3 and 6? Also, say Book 2 has attributes 3, 5, and 6. Should it be excluded because it has an extra unmatched attribute? –  Tony Apr 10 '12 at 18:17
    
Book 1 has attribuates 3 and 6. I would like to return, for example, Book 5 which has attributes 3 and 6. I do not want to return Book 2, which has attributes 3, 4, and 6. I will edit to further explain. –  tommy_o Apr 10 '12 at 19:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

EDIT: Below are several queries that produce the desired results. They may have rather different performance depending on indexes, statistics, ... . Examination of the execution plans with real data should be enlightening.

-- Sample data.
declare @BookMap as Table ( BookId int not null, AttributeId int not null ) 
insert into @BookMap ( BookId, AttributeId ) values 
  (1, 3), (1, 6), 
  (2, 3), (2, 4), (2, 6), 
  (5, 3), (5, 6), 
  (6, 3), (6, 5)
select * from @BookMap 

-- Target book.
declare @BookId as Int = 1 
select AttributeId 
  from @BookMap 
  where BookId = @BookId 

-- Books with matching attributes using NOT EXISTS in the last line. 
select BookId 
  from ( 
    select BookId, Sum( 1 ) as MatchCount 
      from @BookMap as BM 
      where BookId <> @BookId and AttributeId in ( select AttributeId from @BookMap where BookId = @BookId ) 
      group by BookId ) as Ellen 
    where 
      -- The number of matching attributes is the number of desired attributes. 
      MatchCount = ( select Count( 42 ) from @BookMap where BookId = @BookId ) and 
      -- There are no other attributes as determined by looking for additional attributes. 
      not exists ( select 42 from @BookMap where BookId = Ellen.BookId and AttributeId not in ( select AttributeId from @BookMap where BookId = @BookId ) ) 

-- Books with matching attributes using COUNT() in the last line. 
select BookId 
  from ( 
    select BookId, Sum( 1 ) as MatchCount 
      from @BookMap as BM 
      where BookId <> @BookId and AttributeId in ( select AttributeId from @BookMap where BookId = @BookId ) 
      group by BookId ) as Ellen 
    where 
      -- The number of matching attributes is the number of desired attributes. 
      MatchCount = ( select Count( 42 ) from @BookMap where BookId = @BookId ) and 
      -- There are no other attributes as determined by counting attributes. 
      ( select Count( 42 ) from @BookMap where BookId = Ellen.BookId ) = ( select Count( 42 ) from @BookMap where BookId = @BookId ) 



-- Display the attributes that we must, and must not, match.
select distinct AttributeId,
  case when AttributeId in ( select AttributeId from @BookMap where BookId = @BookId ) then 1 else 0 end as MustMatch,
  case when AttributeId not in ( select AttributeId from @BookMap where BookId = @BookId ) then 1 else 0 end as MustNotMatch
  from @BookMap



-- Get the similar books using SUM() in the last line.
; with A as (
  -- All attributes with MustMatch/MustNotMatch flags.
  select distinct AttributeId,
    case when AttributeId in ( select AttributeId from @BookMap where BookId = @BookId ) then 1 else 0 end as MustMatch,
    case when AttributeId not in ( select AttributeId from @BookMap where BookId = @BookId ) then 1 else 0 end as MustNotMatch
    from @BookMap
  )
select BookId
  from @BookMap as B inner join
    A as A on A.AttributeId = B.AttributeId
  where BookId <> @BookId
  group by BookId
  having Sum( MustNotMatch ) = 0 and Sum( MustMatch ) = ( select Count( 42 ) from @BookMap where BookId = @BookId )

-- Get the similar books using MAX() in the last line.
; with A as (
  -- All attributes with MustMatch/MustNotMatch flags.
  select distinct AttributeId,
    case when AttributeId in ( select AttributeId from @BookMap where BookId = @BookId ) then 1 else 0 end as MustMatch,
    case when AttributeId not in ( select AttributeId from @BookMap where BookId = @BookId ) then 1 else 0 end as MustNotMatch
    from @BookMap
  )
select BookId
  from @BookMap as B inner join
    A as A on A.AttributeId = B.AttributeId
  where BookId <> @BookId
  group by BookId
  having Max( MustNotMatch ) = 0 and Sum( MustMatch ) = ( select Count( 42 ) from @BookMap where BookId = @BookId )



-- Get the similar books without using SUM() and with extra credit for using a Cartesian product.
--   Using MAX() in the last line.
; with A as (
  -- All attributes with MustMatch/MustNotMatch flags.
  select distinct AttributeId,
    case when AttributeId in ( select AttributeId from @BookMap where BookId = @BookId ) then 1 else 0 end as MustMatch
    from @BookMap
  ),
B as (
  -- All books except the search pattern book.
  select distinct BookId
    from @BookMap
    where BookId <> @BookId ),
P as (
  -- Cross product plus original data and coefficient of wickedness.
  select B.BookId, A.AttributeId, A.MustMatch,
    case
      when MustMatch = 1 and T.AttributeId is not NULL then 0
      when MustMatch = 0 and T.AttributeId is NULL then 0
      else 1
      end as Wicked
    from B cross join
      A left outer join
      @BookMap as T on T.BookId = B.BookId and T.AttributeId = A.AttributeId
  )
select BookId
  from B
  where ( select Max( Wicked ) from P where P.BookId = B.BookId ) = 0

-- Get the similar books without using SUM() and with extra credit for using a Cartesian product.
--   Using NOT EXISTS in the last line.
; with A as (
  -- All attributes with MustMatch/MustNotMatch flags.
  select distinct AttributeId,
    case when AttributeId in ( select AttributeId from @BookMap where BookId = @BookId ) then 1 else 0 end as MustMatch
    from @BookMap
  ),
B as (
  -- All books except the search pattern book.
  select distinct BookId
    from @BookMap
    where BookId <> @BookId ),
P as (
  -- Cross product plus original data and coefficient of wickedness.
  select B.BookId, A.AttributeId, A.MustMatch,
    case
      when MustMatch = 1 and T.AttributeId is not NULL then 0
      when MustMatch = 0 and T.AttributeId is NULL then 0
      else 1
      end as Wicked
    from B cross join
      A left outer join
      @BookMap as T on T.BookId = B.BookId and T.AttributeId = A.AttributeId
  )
select BookId
  from B
  where not exists ( select 42 from P where P.BookId = B.BookId and Wicked = 1 )

At least I made good use of my time during a somewhat tedious marketing presentation.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a fantastic answer, thank you. Still testing for performance, but it appears to fit the bill exactly. –  tommy_o Apr 11 '12 at 19:00
SELECT b.bookID
FROM BookMaP A
INNER JOIN BookMap B
   ON a.attributeID = B.AttributeID
WHERE a.BookID = 1 -- The id you want to compare against
GROUP BY b.bookID
HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT b.AttributeID) = COUNT(DISTINCT a.AttributeID)

I think aggregation and a self JOIN is the way to go. This may need tweaking, and you may need to just specify the count in the HAVING clause.

share|improve this answer
1  
I tested this here (sqlfiddle.com/#!3/a9eec/1) and it seems to return every book that has any attribute in common. I think it's because when you group by b.BookId and then count (on those rows) the distinct b.AttributeID records and compare them (on those same rows that inner joined on AttributeID) the distinct a.AttributeID records you will always have the same result. This is because only the a.AttributeID records that match B will be in that group due to the inner join. –  Jeremy Pridemore Apr 10 '12 at 20:47

I tested my answer out here: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!3/a9eec/4 (As well as on my local server)

;WITH AttributeSet AS
(
  SELECT DISTINCT
    B.BookId
    , SUBSTRING((SELECT 
                    (',' + CAST(A.AttributeId AS VARCHAR(4)))
                FROM BookMap A
                WHERE A.BookId = B.BookId
                ORDER BY A.AttributeId
                FOR XML PATH ('')),2,9999) AS AttributeSet
  FROM BookMap B
)
SELECT
    MatchingBooks.BookId
FROM AttributeSet BaseBook
INNER JOIN AttributeSet MatchingBooks
    ON MatchingBooks.AttributeSet = BaseBook.AttributeSet
WHERE BaseBook.BookId = 1
share|improve this answer
1  
Methinks you ought to have an ORDER BY when assembling the attribute set. If you don't specify it then SQL Server can return results in any order. –  HABO Apr 10 '12 at 22:22
    
@user92546 I did in one of my test queries, but it looks like I forgot it when I pasted into sqlfiddle and here. Thanks for pointing it out! I'll update now. –  Jeremy Pridemore Apr 10 '12 at 22:41
    
While this solution worked in the example scenario, this is not as scalable with my real-world dataset (0.5 million object IDs with a total of 6.5 million records) as user92546's answer. –  tommy_o Apr 11 '12 at 19:03

To get the book list with the matching attribute:

select distinct B1.BookId, B1.AttributeId, B2.BookId as MatchingBookId 
from BookMap as B1
   inner join BookMap as B2 on B1.AttributeId = B2.AttributeId
where B1.BookId <> B2.BookId

To get just the matching book list:

select distinct B1.BookId, B2.BookId as MatchingBookId
from BookMap as B1
   inner join BookMap as B2 on B1.AttributeId = B2.AttributeId
where B1.BookId <> B2.BookId

.. asked for clarification in comment.

share|improve this answer
    
The first query will return dupes since Book1 will be on both sides of the JOIN for every attribute that it has assigned, as will every other book in the list. Same with the second query. –  JNK Apr 10 '12 at 18:36
    
I added the where clause to prevent the book on both sides, but it's moot since the clarification above. –  Tony Apr 11 '12 at 14:34

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